Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes: Top 5 Picks Reviewed



You’re going to hear a whole lot of this acronym this year — LPVO. It stands for Low-Powered Variable Optic, and it’s the insurgent category of riflescopes from at least a dozen brands. What are you going to hear precious little about? Spotting scopes.

Those are two of the dominant trends in sporting optics that we took away from SHOT Show 2022, and we’ll detail the reasons for each. But it’s also worth considering the other trend: not every brand has a new optic model this year. That’s largely because of the same dynamics we’ve seen in other categories, including ammunition and guns. There is simply too much energy being devoted to fulfilling orders with existing inventory and there’s no time to devote resources to innovation. Brands that planned to introduce new products this year have slow-rolled the releases, largely because they can’t get basic components—aluminum riflescope tubes, objective lens elements, illumination modules, and the seals that keep optics water- and fog-free—because of supply chain woes.

Still, there’s a lot to look at — and through — this year when it comes to riflescopes. A couple brands, including Zeiss and Vortex, have tasty new precision riflescopes. But it’s the LPVOs that rule the day. One reason they’re on the rise is that they are so versatile, suited for AR platforms but also straight-wall carbines, shotguns, and even muzzleloaders and dangerous-game rifles. Most of these scopes are in the 1-6x, 1-8x, or 1-10x magnification range, and generally feature 24mm objective lenses. The first-plane reticle models are the best expressions of the platform’s versatility. At 1-4x, the illuminated reticles work as a red-dot sight, giving shooters quick target acquisition and high situational awareness in any light conditions. But at 5-8x or 5-10x, many of those front-plane reticles enlarge to reveal holdover references that allow for surprisingly precise bullet placement. Adding to their versatility: these first-plane models can be set on any magnification to benefit from reticle references.

New LPVOs 2022

As with nature, the optics market abhors a vacuum, and most of us have all the 5-25×56 precision behemoths and 4-12×44 hunting scopes (and spotters) we need. But a little 1-8×24? We can always find a gun begging to be fitted with such a smart and versatile accompaniment.

EOTech Vudu 1-10×28 FFP

We’ve been charmed by the low-mag Vudu since EOTech brought out a 1-6x version back in 2015. That first-plane model had the simple SR-3 reticle with an illuminated inner speed ring and BDC references tuned to the drop of standard 5.56 rounds.

This year’s model has a 10-times magnification range and a little larger objective lens, thanks to its 34mm tube. But it also has a new generation of that venerable SR-series reticle. Available in either the MOA-based SR-4 or Mil-based SR-5 or LE-5 reticles, each with abundant elevation and windage references, this is a scope for fast close-in work and surprisingly precise distance shooting. For hunters, think dark-timber elk or African savannah game, and for target shooters, think about engaging the wide range of targets at modest distances. The scope has 10 brightness settings engaged with a push-button illumination control, re-indexable low-profile turrets, and excellent Japanese glass.

EOTech Vudu 1-10×24 Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-10x24mm
  • Reticle Options: SR-4 features 40 MOA drop and windage and 100 MOA total travel. The SR-5 has 29 Mils of total elevation, and an open aiming circle, compared with the center crosshair of the LE-5.
  • MSRP: $1,799

Bushnell Trophy Quick Acquisition 1-6×24

Bushnell’s newest entry in the Trophy line won’t win many long-distance precision target matches, but it’s not intended to. This is a scope for short to mid-range hunting. Think straight-wall cartridges in lever guns, slug guns, and ARs.

The second-plane reticle has six illumination intensity settings and ½ MOA click values under its capped turrets. The reticle itself allows for instant holdovers of up to 20 MOA in 2 MOA steps, allowing shooters to go from, say, a 50-yard zero out to 200 yards and beyond instantly, without dialing turrets or counting fine reticle references.

Bushnell Trophy QA 1-6×24 Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-6×24
  • Reticle Options: Second-plane ½ MOA illuminated dot-drop with 2 MOA increments

Leupold Patrol 6HD

Leupold’s entry into the LPVO is a 1-6x low-profile gem that comes in two internal configurations. Both have second-plane reticles and 30mm tubes and Leupold’s proprietary glare-reducing coatings. The $1,399 model features ¼ MOA adjustments under capped turrets and Leupold’s illuminated FireDot duplex reticle. The other, priced at $1,499, has the same ¼ MOA click values but comes with Leupold’s CDS-ZL2 turret system that is fully compatible with custom dials that allow for two revolutions of elevation adjustment. CDS-ZL2 model has an illuminated CM-R2 reticle with a 6 MOA aiming circle and 43 MOA of elevation holds, making it a good choice for both close-in work and precision shooting at modest ranges.

Both models come with an integral throw lever to make magnification changes quickly and an in-scope anti-cant level to simplify mounting and reduce imprecision at longer ranges. Both feature a whopping 170 MOA of total internal elevation adjustment and both weigh just a shade over a pound.

Leupold Patrol 6HD Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-6×24
  • Reticle Options: The standard model features Leupold’s FireDot duplex reticle in the second plane. The CDS-ZL2 is built around the CM-R2 MOA-based reticle with 43 MOA of elevation references and a 6 MOA center aiming circle.

GPO GPOTAC 1-8x24i

GPO has entered the tactical game with a first-plane LPVO built on a 34mm tube and an illuminated mil-spec horseshoe-type reticle. The 1-8x version of the GPOTAC has 0.1 Mil click values and 104 inches of total elevation travel. The auto-off illumination system lights up the center aiming dot and horseshoe center circle with non-illuminated elevation and windage hashes. At nearly $2,000, this isn’t a casual optic, but it has wide versatility, from its intended use on AR platforms to dangerous-game rifles and other short- to medium-range shooting.

GPO GPOTAC Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-8×24
  • Reticle Options: Called the Taci Reticle, the first-plane design features an illuminated center dot (.01 Mil) and enter aiming circle and non-illuminated hash-indicated elevation and windage marks on the central stadia.
  • MSRP: $1,999

Primary Arms PLx 1-8×24

This Texas-based outfit has gone from selling its competitors’ products to branding a line of its own optics. The 1-8×24 PLx is designed to do one thing: direct 5.56 and .308 bullets downrange. The partial red illumination in the first-plane Raptor reticle is compatible with night-vision on the lowest settings, a feature that hints at its tactical intent. The re-zeroable turrets feature 0.1 Mil click adjustments and the 34mm tube holds nearly 30 Mil of total elevation and windage adjustment. The turret has a chevron aiming point and holdover references out to the equivalent of 800 yards with a 100-yard zero.

Primary Arms PLx Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-8×24
  • Reticle Options: First-plane illuminated ACSS Raptor M2 reticle tuned to 5.56/.308 drop profiles
  • MSRP: $1,499

Tract TORIC 1-8×24

This direct-to-consumer optics brand is expanding its TORIC line of riflescopes with a tasty LPVO in both MOA and MRAD configurations. Externally, these look and operate the same way: they’re built on graphite 30mm tubes and feature capped turrets tuned to .2 MRAD (or .5 MOA) click adjustments with tool-less zero reset. The scopes, which retail for $1,194, weigh just 20 ounces and measure only 11 inches, making them good mates for ARs, lightweight mountain rifles, and your next 350 Legend or .45/70.

The second-plane illuminated reticles are equally similar: modified German 1 duplex reticles with bold peripheral stadia. But the magic happens inside the lines. The MOA-based reticle is divided into 4 and 10 MOA hashes, offering 40 MOA of both holdover and windage. The MRAD version has 1 and 2.5 MRAD hashes, with 10 MRAD of both holdover and holdoff.

Tract TORIC 1-8×24 Specifications

  • Configuration: 1-8×24
  • Reticle Options: Either MRAD or MOA-based reticles in second plane with 30 MIL/100 MOA total elevation adjustment
  • MSRP: $1,194

New Precision Riflescopes 2022

Not all the innovation this year is in the LPVO category. A number of brands are bringing to market some extremely appealing precisions scopes. Here are the standouts.

Vortex Razor HD Gen III 6-36×56

Vortex has a new flagship, an update to its very successful Razor HD riflescope. The third-generation model has more magnification, a new EBR-7D reticle in the first focal plane that’s available in either MOA or MRAD references, and even brighter glass than previous models.

The scope is built around a reticle intended for elite long-range target shooters. The stratospheric price puts it out of range of most mortals, but for competition shooters looking for a reticle with clear windage and elevation holds at any magnification above 10x, this is a great addition to the field. Coupled with Vortex’s extremely precise and positive exposed turrets that allow shooters to set their zero between clicks and the scope’s abundant internal adjustment (120 MOA, 36.1 MRAD elevation range), the simple illumination adjustment and throw lever make adjustments quick and precise. The Christmas-tree EBR-7D reticle has red LED main-stadia illumination and hashes and dots with 10 MRAD (36 MOA) elevation holds and 10.5 MRAD of windage that step out from a .03 mil center aiming dot.

Vortex Razor HD Gen III 6-36×56 Specifications

  • Configuration: 6-36×56
  • Reticle Options: The new EBR-7D is available in either MOA or MRAD configurations. Both feature a center aiming dot (.1 MOA or .03 MRAD) and 10 MRAD (36 MOA) of elevation holds

Zeiss LRP S5

Zeiss has finally entered the precision-scope conversation with a pair of doozies. The new LRP S5 line has a lower-powered 3-18×50 that makes a great crossover scope for hunting and precision shooting. The 5-25×56 is all about going long.

Both scopes are built on 34mm tubes, and both feature some of the most positive turrets on the market, with smart amplified clicks at important demarcations (1 mil or 5 MOA). And both feature class-leading internal adjustment; 40.7 MRAD (140 MOA) of elevation travel. The LRP are built behind Zeiss’s best class of glass, which means images are sharp and clear at any magnification.

In keeping with the modification vibe, both scopes are available with Zeiss’s ZE-MRi or MOAi first-plane reticles that feature an open aiming point. The mil version is a modified Christmas tree design with a blizzard of holds for elevation and windage. The MOA version is a simpler hash style. The only thing that’s not twinned in these scopes is their price. The 3-18x version will sell for $3,299 while the 5-25x version retails for $3,599.

Zeiss LRP S5 Specifications

  • Configuration: 3-18×50 and 5-25×25
  • Reticle Options: First-plane MRAD version is the ZE-MRi, with 10 mils of elevation hold and 20.2 mils windage. The MOA version is the ZE-MOAi with 36 MOA of elevation references.
  • MSRP: $3,299 for the 3-18×30; $3,599 for the 5-56×56

Burris XTR Pro

Neither Burris nor its kissing European cousin, Steiner, exhibited this year at SHOT, but Burris has some interesting news for PRS and NRL shooters. The brand is upgrading its XTR line of tactical scopes with brand new glass, pimped-out furniture, and a new zero stop that doesn’t require tools. And, for steel-ringers who want a fully customizable elevation turret, the “Race Dial” system allows them to add an indexable ring to make speed dialing to known distances a cinch.

The updated line is built on the same 34mm 5-30×56 configuration, though the platform features new and brighter glass. The differences are inside. Burris is offering the new XTR in three reticle choices: two versions of the Special Competition Reticle (SCR-2) and the venerable TREMOR5. All use milliradian references.

Burris XTR Pro Specifications

  • Configuration: 5-30×56
  • Reticle Options: TREMOR5 or either the SCR 2 or SCR 2 ¼ Mil. All feature 26 mil (90 MOA) of total elevation adjustment.
  • MSRP: $2,639 for the SCR 2 models, $2,999 for the TREMOR5 reticle

Hawke Frontier 34 FFP

Hawke has entered the precision target game with a pair of new first-plane models. The 3-18×50 model costs around $1,300 and the 5-30×56 version will sell for about $100 more. Both are built on 34mm tubes and both feature Hawke’s legendary wide field of view.

Both have exposed “Zero Lock ‘n Stop” turrets (which sounds like the commands you’d give a person on fire) and shooters have a choice of illuminated reticles tuned to MOA (the MOA Pro Ext) or Mils (Mil-Pro Ext). In the 5-30x model, the Mil version has 15 Mils of holdover and 1, 0.2, and 0.1 Mil brackets for range finding in the semi-Christmas tree design. The MOA version has 60 MOA of holdover.

Hawke Frontier 34 FFP Specifications

  • Configuration: 3-18×50 and 5-30×56
  • Reticle Options: Both scopes are available in either Mil or MOA versions. They both feature modified Christmas-tree designs with red LED illumination and abundant (and really smart) windage and holdover references.
  • MSRP: $1,299 for the 3-18×50 or $1,399 for the 5-30×56

New Hunting Riflescopes 2022

One of the dominant trends in the rifle category over the past year is the rise of the semi-custom mountain rifle. Think about the Weatherby Mark V Backcountry Ti, Browning X-Bolt Mountain Pro, Savage 110 Ultralight, and the new Bergara Premier Mountain, among many others. You’re not going to put a 2-pound, 34mm precision scope on these rifles, which tip the scales at around 6 pounds. You’re going to find a premium lightweight riflescope to do the job, and manufacturers have a few you should consider this year. Meopta, Maven, and GPO all have scopes configured for a wide variety of hunting, but they have in common light weights, second-plane reticles, and useful magnification ranges.

Meopta MeoSport R 3-15×50 RD

Meopta is swinging for value-conscious consumers with its new MeoSport R 3-15×50 RD riflescope, priced well under $500. The versatile configuration features an illuminated 4C reticle in the second plane, 0.1 Mil windage and elevation adjustments with capped, lockable re-zeroable turrets, and a 30mm tube. The scope ships with indexed 1.5-inch scope rings that mate up with a white line on the belly of the scope to aid in mounting. Of interest to the legion of new shooters competing in rimfire target matches, the scope has a side focus from 10 yards to infinity.

Meopta MeoSport R Specifications

  • Configuration: 4-15×50
  • Reticle Options: illuminated 4C reticle in second focal plane
  • MSRP: $449

Maven CRS Riflescopes

Maven is coming out with a pair of scopes in a new affordable product line. The CRS line is the riflescope equivalent of the company’s C-Series binoculars, priced below the flagship lines but featuring a wide variety of attributes that should appeal to both beginning and veteran shooters.

In the CRS line, the 3-12×40 CRS.1 sells for $450. The 4-16×44 CRS.2 sells for $550. Both are built on 1-inch tubes and the Simplified Holdover Reticle (CSHR) in the second plane is controlled by capped turrets tuned to .25 MOA click values. The CRS.2 has a side parallax focus, while the CRS.1 does not.

The reticle features modified duplex stadia, but has holds for 5, 10, and 20 MOA at the highest power on both scopes (those are 20, 40, and 80 MOA at the lowest magnifications). The CRS.1 weighs a shade over 14 ounces, making it a great choice for a mountain rifle.

Maven CRS Specifications

  • Configuration: 3-12×40 and 4-16×44
  • Reticle Options: Both scopes feature the same CSHR holdover duplex reticle in the second plane. The CRS.1 has 50 MOA of total internal adjustment; the CRS.2 has 36 MOA of range.
  • MSRP: $450 and $550

GPO SPECTRA 7.5x50i

German Precision Optics is going old-school (and maybe even German old-school) with a fixed-power riflescope that would be at home on any number of new mountain rifles (or Bavarian driven hunts). At 7.5-power, the 30mm scope brings a lighter-weight build and ample optical attributes.

The heart of the scope is a traditional German 4 modified-duplex reticle with an illuminated center dot behind a 50mm objective lens. The SPECTRA has a 100-yard fixed parallax and capped turrets tuned to fractions of inches (or centimeters). With fewer mechanical parts, the scope should be more durable than variable-power models, but in case something goes wrong, the GPO is covered by the company’s Spectacular Lifetime Warranty.

GPO SPECTRA Specifications

  • Configuration: 7.5×50
  • Reticle Details: Illuminated G4i in first plane and 100 inches of total elevation and windage adjustment
  • MSRP: $599

FAQs

Can you put a scope on a AR carry handle?

Yes. But there are optics specifically designed for that purpose and if you want the added functionality that a carry handle gives you then more power to you. You’ve got options in all price ranges from sub $100 to over $1,000 depending on your budget and needs

(Get More Info)

What is s good sight for a AR carry handle?

The 4 Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes Trijicon ACOG 3x24mm Compact: Best Overall. Holosun HS510C: Best for Holographics. Sig Sauer Romeo Zero: Best for Budget. Aimpoint PRO Red Dot: Best for Red Dot Sights

(Get More Info)

What scopes do the military use on AR 15?

The Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps use the Trijicon TA31RCO ACOG, which has a 32mm objective lens and a 4× magnification (4×32). It is specially designed with ballistic compensating reticles that are also fiber optic and tritium illuminated

(Get More Info)

Should I put a scope or red dot on my AR?

If you’re looking for a lightweight package that shoots quickly up close, go with a red dot. If you intend on making precise shots at targets in the distance, put a scope on your rifle. If you want a combination of both, use a 1 powered variable scope or get TWO rifles!

(Get More Info)

The Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes in 2022

The Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes in 2022 Today I’m going to show you the best AR-15 carry handle scopes. In fact: I’ve hand- tested over 10 scopes alone for this review. The best part? I’ve sorted the scopes by use. So whether you’re on a budget or need the best scopes for AR-15 with carry handle, you’ll find it here. Let’s dive in! If you’re pressed on time, here’s a quick list of the best AR-15 carry handle scopes: Trijicon ACOG 3x24mm Compact: Best Overall Holosun HS510C: Best for Holographics Sig Sauer Romeo Zero: Best for Budget Aimpoint PRO Red Dot: Best for Red Dot Sights 1. Trijicon ACOG 3x24mm Compact: Best Overall Trijicon ACOGs are great scopes in general and the 3x24mm compact is by far the best of them. The compact, lightweight design makes it the best optic for carry handle on your AR-15 or AK-47. Trijicon ACOGs are combat tested and are favored by military and law enforcement. Want to know more? Read on… Glass Clarity & Reticle Trijicon ACOGs are pricey, but they’re well worth it because the glass is exceptionally clear. Not only is the glass clarity top notch, but the ACOG uses tritium and fiber optics for illumination. This means that you’ll be able to see your reticle both day and night. It also adjusts the illumination for you by gauging the ambient light. Plus, it’s completely battery free, so you’ll never have to worry about it failing when you need it the most. The reticle itself is a green crosshair 223/55 grain ballistic reticle. The green crosshairs are a little harder to see in the daylight than red, but I like it because it’s not as harsh on the eyes either. And the green is perfectly bright and easy to see at night. Eye Relief & Eye Box Here’s the one downside to the Trijicon ACOG 3x24mm compact: the eye relief is only 1.4”. It’s a little forgiving though and is actually pretty good for a standard AK stock. Plus, as long as you keep a good cheek weld, it’s not a huge problem for AR-15s either. Another perk to the ACOG is that it uses the Bindon Aiming Concept, which utilizes a both eyes open concept. Having the use of both eyes has multiple perks that all make it an exceptional choice for combat or tactical situations. You get the full use of your peripheral vision for maximum situational awareness. And using both eyes saves time and allows you to acquire your target fast. It’s almost as fast as what you get using a red dot sight. Durability When you’re looking for the best scope for your AR-15, you want to know that you’re getting something durable and reliable. The Trijicon ACOG 3x24mm compact exceeds all expectations in that area. It is rugged and almost indestructible. It’s housed in aircraft quality aluminum that can take a beating and not show a scratch. On top of that, this scope is waterproof, fogproof,…

Yes! I want More

7 Best Scopes For AR-15 (with Carry Handle) in 2022

7 Best Scopes For AR-15 (with Carry Handle) in 2022HuntingMark is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn MoreAre you trying to figure out how to mount a scope on an AR-15 with a carry handle? It was not that long ago that AR-15 variants came with a carry handle that was not removable. Many of them are still in circulation. Even with a removable carry handle, there are those who prefer to keep the handle on but would like to still use a scope or sight.While this comes with some complications, it doesn’t have to be difficult to find a scope that will do the job for you and do it well enough to let you shoot accurately to your heart’s content. In this article, we’re going to discuss the considerations you need to address when mounting a scope on a carry handle and go over our top 7 recommendations for scopes designed to mount on a carry handle instead of a flat top.Dealing With the Added HeightThe biggest issue that mounting an optic on a carry handle introduces is how much higher up the scope is than one that is mounted directly onto the flat top via a picatinny or weaver rail. Even when a scope is mounted onto the upper receiver, part of the zeroing process is compensating for the reticle being located an inch or so higher than where the bullet exits the barrel.A carry handle can add up to a full two inches to that difference, along with the height of the optic itself. This has some serious implications for sighting in your scope, of course, but it’s also important to consider how this affects your ability to use the scope.With that much added height, it’s often difficult to position your eye properly in the eye box within the eye relief of the scope. This is even harder if it’s important to you (like it is for me) to be comfortable while shooting. Between the zeroing issues and the usability issues, you may be wondering why anyone bothers trying to make it work.There are a few reasons why a shooter may want to use an optic with a carry handle. Number one, the carry handle may not actually be removable. Number two, they may like the functionality of the carry handle, and number three, the free market has delivered some pretty awesome products to make this kind of setup work incredibly well.Beyond the Scope – What Else Do You Need?The #1 thing you’ll most likely need is a cheek riser to get a comfortable cheek weld on your AR. Something like this. Cheek risers come in different heights and do have some variation in compatibility, so you’ll want to make sure you grab the right one for your model and needs. These cheek risers are typically pretty affordable, so we highly recommend picking one up.Beyond the cheek riser, you may also want to add an extended pad for the rifle butt. A lot of modern AR variants come with one of these already, but if you’re putting an optic on a carry handle chances are you have an older one that may not have it, or you may have a newer one that didn’t come with…

Show Me More


>8:371.Vortex Razor HD Gen II-E Riflescope▻Amazon US: https://amzn.to/36nzs7U———-✓2.Steiner P4Xi▻Amazon US: …YouTube · Latest Gear · 4 weeks ago4 key moments in this videoMissing: carry ‎handle ‎2023

Top 6 Best AR15 Carry Handle Scopes 2022 – TheGunZone

Best AR15 Carry Handle Scopes of 2022 The AR15 platform is right up there when it comes to popularity. It provides flexibility for different shooting applications, and its continual growth has spawned a whole accessory industry. This offers shooters the ability to personalize and customize their AR15 exactly as they wish. Including a carry handle on your weapon is something that some owners consider as being a worthy addition. While this is fine, the issue that then arises relates to finding a suitable scope to match. This is where we intend to help by reviewing six of the best AR15 carry handle scopes currently available. Photo by Drenaline We’ve also included a useful buying guide that should help make your choice that much easier. When choosing an AR15 carry handle scope, you should bear in mind some key factors. These include ease of mounting, excellent positioning on your carry handle, and maximum stability. You must also consider the lens quality, durability and look at any required features that go with your shooting style. The carry handle scopes we will review offer the above and more. So, let’s start with the… Top 6 Best AR15 Carry Handle Scopes in 2022 Reviews 1 Barska 4×20 Electro Sight Rifle Scope – Model: AC11608 – Best Value for the Money AR15 Carry Handle Scope Barska offers a good range of acceptably priced optics. This fixed magnification model is ideal for carry handle mounting. Specifically built for AR-15 and M-16 weapons… This Barska 4×20 carry handle electro sight scope has been designed specifically for use with M-16 and AR-15 rifles. Construction-wise it is a solid, single scope body design with a 34mm diameter and an integrated base. It also offers waterproof and fog proof protection. This base mounts easily to the inside track of your weapon’s carry handle. There is an included peep sight that allows shooters to use their iron sights. Any shooter looking for a traditionally looking scope will feel at home with this on their weapon. It offers fixed magnification of 4x and comes with a 20mm objective lens. Exit pupil is 5mm, field of view at 100 yards is 22 feet, and eye relief comes in at 2.7-inches. As for adjustability, this is MOA,, and adjustment click values come in 0.5 MOA steps. Finished in black matte, the scope is 6.9-inches in length and weighs 13.4 ounces. Clarity of view with an easy to use reticle…. This scope comes with an improved design along with fully coated optics that afford crisp, clear imaging. As for the non-illuminated reticle, this sits in the SFP (Second Focal Plane) and is classed as a standard black Mil-Dot design. The reticle allows for speed coupled with accuracy and is very easy to use. Barska have included capped turrets which means efficiency when assessing shot compensation. Couple this with the BDC (Bullet Drop Compensator) feature that is calibrated to 500 yards and comes in 100 yard increments; therefore, accurate shot placement is yours. The side adjustment knob is easily accessible for windage and elevation settings. What’s in the box? Along with the scope, you will get scope caps, a lens cloth, and a one year limited warranty. While Barska does include mounting hardware (brackets) with…

See the crazy Words

Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes: Top 5 Picks Reviewed

Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scopes: Top 5 Picks Reviewed The AR-15 platform has become one of the most popular rifle styles among shooters.   Styles have changed over the years, with most new AR-15’s having a flat top style.  Still, there is much to be said for the venerable carry handle upper receiver style.  Finding a scope that will mount on an AR-15 carry handle is challenging.  Here are our picks for the best AR-15 carry handle scopes. Our Picks for the Best AR-15 Mounted Scopes Trijicon ACOG 4X32EOTech 512 A65 Holographic scopeVortex Optics Sparc OpticBarska 4X20 ScopeAT3 Tactical RD-50 Micro Sight Our list offers a wide variety of scope styles and designs.  Choosing a carry handle scope is about finding the optic that best fits your shooting situation’s needs.  No scope will fit every shooter’s needs.  Finding the right combination of features makes it extremely important to know what you expect from your optic before purchasing and mounting a scope on your rifle. #1 Scope SCOPE DETAILS #1 Scope Trijicon ACOG 4X32 Nitrogen filled to eliminate fogging. No batteries to change or fail. Field of view in feet – 36.8 feet at 100 yards. Check Price on Amazon.com Check Price on OpticsPlanet.com EOTech 512 A65 Twenty daylight illumination settings for any sunlight conditions. The auto-shutoff feature saves batteries. Easy mount options for AR-15 carry handle. Check Price on Amazon.com Check Price on OpticsPlanet.com Vortex Optics Sparc II Incredibly clear optics for a sight in this price range. Parallax free shooting. Vortex Optics no question asked lifetime warranty. Check Price on Amazon.com Check Price on OpticsPlanet.com What I Look for in a Carry Handle Mount Scope First, I look for all the other things that I would want in a rifle optic. That doesn’t change when discussing types of mounts.  In general, the most important things to look for in any scope include: The glass – I want the highest quality glass I can find in the scope.  The optics will only perform as good as the glass.   Poor glass can distort images, cause problems with focus, and fail to transmit and gather light properly.Quality construction – The quality of the construction will affect every aspect of the performance of the scope.  Poor construction will cause the scope to fail, problems with fogging and moisture, and poor optical performance.Reticle selection – Reticle selection is a more personal choice.  Whether you prefer a traditional reticle, a red dot, or a mil-dot style, the reticle should be clear and precise.  If possible, on optical scopes, select a scope with a second or first focal plane reticle etched on the glass. The Very Best AR-15 Carry Handle Scope – Trijicon ACOG 4X32 If you ask a combat veteran or a law enforcement officer which scope they want on an AR-15 and the answer is a Trijicon ACOG, almost without fail.  Experience worldwide among combat veterans and law enforcement tells the tale of the durability and the dependability of the Trijicon ACOG line of scopes. It should come as no surprise that the Trijicon ACOG 4X32 scope is on our list of the best AR-15 carry handle rile scopes.  The ACOG scope is as tough as nails and delivers crystal clear vision rain or shine.  The ACOG 4X32 scope fits nicely on the carry handle of an AR-15…

See the difference you make

Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics [2022]: Red Dots to Magnified

Best AR-15 Scopes & Optics [2022]: Red Dots to Magnified Not sure what optic or scope to get for your AR? We’ve bought or used almost all of them… A Couple AR-15 Optics We’ll cover 1x optics and magnified scopes, plus recommended mounts, accessories, and backup sights.  All with view-throughs and hands-on experience. By the end of this, you’ll know the perfect one for your budget and end use. Summary of Our Top Picks Best Bang-For-The-Buck Red Dot Sig Sauer Romeo5 Our favorite under-$200 red dot. Higher-End Red Dot Trijicon MRO Want something more robust? We love the Trijicon MRO. Best Holographic Sight EOTech EXPS 2-0 Our go-to holographic sight that’s compact, reliable, and our favorite type of reticle. Table of ContentsLoading… These are “red dots” or “reflex” sights which are exactly what they sound like…they superimpose a red dot as the aiming reticle. Tested Budget Red Dots All On Whereas with standard “iron sights” where you normally keep one eye closed and have to perfectly line up the two sights…red dots allow you to keep both eyes open and have a lot more leeway with where your head or eyes are positioned. This makes them much faster in acquiring a target and also allows for more peripheral vision. Plus, they are much more useful in darker environments. Sig Sauer MPX K Shooting with Sig MSR 1. Sig Sauer Romeo 5 Red dots in the $100 to $200 space have multiplied recently and are picking up nice upgrades previously only available to high-end ones. Henry Big Boy X Sig Sauer Romeo 5 The Sig Romeo 5 brings eight daylight settings (that actually are visible in bright light) and two night vision settings. PLUS motion on and off so you don’t have to deal with buttons. Not that you couldn’t just leave it on since battery life is at 50,000+ hours at a medium setting. Sig Romeo5 Top Buttons Glass is pretty clear with a good field of view. And for around $120 it’s pretty robust that I wouldn’t hesitate to have it on a home defense gun. Check out the crispness and slight green glass indoors. Another added bonus is that the Romeo5 comes with a high-rise that’s perfect height for AR-15 shooters. Grunt AR-15 with Romeo5 Red Dot We’ve put TONS rounds through several units and you can get our full report in our Romeo 5 review here. Romeo5 on MP5K and AR-15 Best Bang-For-The-Buck Red Dot 119at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing Prices accurate at time of writing 25% off all OAKLEY products – OAKLEY25 2. Sig Sauer Romeo MSR How about our most budget pick that we would still trust to go on a defensive rifle? That would have to be the Romeo MSR that clocks in around ~$70. You CAN go cheaper but unless it’s purely for plinking I would get this at a minimum. The MSR has taken over our previous affordable recommendation of the Bushnell TRS-25 since that was older tech. Sig Sauer MPX K Shooting with Sig MSR The view-through is slightly smaller but runtime is still rated at 20K hours at a low setting. Speaking of settings…there’s 10 daytime and 2 night-vision settings on a stiff dial. Sig Sauer MPX K with MSR I’ve kept mine…

See the crazy Words

New Riflescopes from SHOT Show 2022 and Beyond

New Riflescopes from SHOT Show 2022 and Beyond You’re going to hear a whole lot of this acronym this year — LPVO. It stands for Low-Powered Variable Optic, and it’s the insurgent category of riflescopes from at least a dozen brands. What are you going to hear precious little about? Spotting scopes. Those are two of the dominant trends in sporting optics that we took away from SHOT Show 2022, and we’ll detail the reasons for each. But it’s also worth considering the other trend: not every brand has a new optic model this year. That’s largely because of the same dynamics we’ve seen in other categories, including ammunition and guns. There is simply too much energy being devoted to fulfilling orders with existing inventory and there’s no time to devote resources to innovation. Brands that planned to introduce new products this year have slow-rolled the releases, largely because they can’t get basic components—aluminum riflescope tubes, objective lens elements, illumination modules, and the seals that keep optics water- and fog-free—because of supply chain woes. Still, there’s a lot to look at — and through — this year when it comes to riflescopes. A couple brands, including Zeiss and Vortex, have tasty new precision riflescopes. But it’s the LPVOs that rule the day. One reason they’re on the rise is that they are so versatile, suited for AR platforms but also straight-wall carbines, shotguns, and even muzzleloaders and dangerous-game rifles. Most of these scopes are in the 1-6x, 1-8x, or 1-10x magnification range, and generally feature 24mm objective lenses. The first-plane reticle models are the best expressions of the platform’s versatility. At 1-4x, the illuminated reticles work as a red-dot sight, giving shooters quick target acquisition and high situational awareness in any light conditions. But at 5-8x or 5-10x, many of those front-plane reticles enlarge to reveal holdover references that allow for surprisingly precise bullet placement. Adding to their versatility: these first-plane models can be set on any magnification to benefit from reticle references. New LPVOs 2022 As with nature, the optics market abhors a vacuum, and most of us have all the 5-25×56 precision behemoths and 4-12×44 hunting scopes (and spotters) we need. But a little 1-8×24? We can always find a gun begging to be fitted with such a smart and versatile accompaniment. EOTech Vudu 1-10×28 FFP We’ve been charmed by the low-mag Vudu since EOTech brought out a 1-6x version back in 2015. That first-plane model had the simple SR-3 reticle with an illuminated inner speed ring and BDC references tuned to the drop of standard 5.56 rounds. This year’s model has a 10-times magnification range and a little larger objective lens, thanks to its 34mm tube. But it also has a new generation of that venerable SR-series reticle. Available in either the MOA-based SR-4 or Mil-based SR-5 or LE-5 reticles, each with abundant elevation and windage references, this is a scope for fast close-in work and surprisingly precise distance shooting. For hunters, think dark-timber elk or African savannah game, and for target shooters, think about…

Discover More Details