Tried & tested: Subea Easybreath full face snorkel mask



What better way to test a snorkel called ‘Easybreath’ than to plunge into the chilly waters of the Solent to discover how it copes with involuntary gasps and splutters?

For our trial, we headed to Osborne Bay, just off Queen Vic’s bolthole on the Isle of Wight, on an uncharacteristically balmy early summer’s day.

The mirror-calm water was inviting and the mercury was rising aboard the boat, but despite the positive omens the Bramblemet weather station was reporting a sea temperature of just 16.8° Celcius – more than enough to cause a sharp intake of breath by any measure.

The first part of the experience demonstrated just how efficient is the snorkel’s ‘Dry-top’ system, courtesy of its on-board ‘buoy’.

Article continues below…


Editors-Choice-Nautibuoy-Platform-credit-Nautibuoy-Marine

Credit: Nautibuoy Marine

Editors-Choice-SEABOB-F5-SR-action-credit-Marc Hillesheim

Credit: Marc Hillesheim


Designed to prevent water coming in should the wearer take a gulp while underwater, the Subea Easybreath immediately locks off the air supply at the moment of submersion. Upon resurfacing, blow out and the buoy is released.

Whether a trickle did get through on our test, it’s hard to say. For if it did, the automatic purge valve fitted to the mask did its job well – we did not notice any water ingress.

Before jumping in, we had adjusted the Subea Easybreath’s head straps – which form an ‘X’ shape across the back of the head – so the mask sat comfortably without putting too much pressure on the face. A gentle tug of the adjusters was all that was necessary.

subea-easybreath-snorkel-air-intake

We deliberately didn’t press the mask to the face, scuba diver style, upon entry to see what would happen – answer, nothing; the snorkel stayed put.

The remainder of our trial was unremarkable; the Subea Easybreath performed admirably to the point where you could almost forget you were wearing it.

Just one point to note is that we only tested the mask while surface swimming – the Dry-top system only works while the snorkel is vertical, meaning it may let in water during duck dives or free diving.

subea-easybreath-snorkel-purge-valve

Given that Subea Easybreath’s designer and retailer – the sports outlet Decathlon – spent seven years perfecting the product, its performance should not come as a surprise.

Our only criticism is that despite the snorkel’s clever construction of separate areas for vision and breathing, we did experience some fogging initially, possibly due to the coldness of the water.

So for our second plunge we tried rubbing a little washing up liquid into the inner lens, which fixed the problem completely.

After that, everything went swimmingly…

MBY rating: 5/5

Value rating: 5/5

Price: £24.99 (inc. VAT)

Subea Easybreath deals

Buy it now on Decathlon.co.uk

Buy it now on argos.co.uk

Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence.

FAQs

Are full face snorkels worth it?

The entire concept of the mask is to improve your snorkeling experience and make it feel naturally easier. Here are some great benefits that full face snorkel masks offer: Clearer View ? Arguably the biggest benefit is the ability to see underwater better than with a regular snorkel mask

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Are full face snorkels actually better than traditional masks?

A: Full face snorkel masks are safe and suitable for casual snorkeling activities. If you’re looking for more serious and vigorous snorkeling we recommend a traditional mask like the Kradan traditional snorkeling mask

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Which full face snorkel mask is best?

The Top 5 Full Face Snorkel Masks in 2022

  • Best Overall: Ocean Reef Aria QR+
  • Best for Travel: Tribord Subea Easybreath.
  • Highest Quality: Cressi Duke.
  • Most Comfortable: Ocean Reef Aria Uno.
  • Hypoallergenic: Aqua Lung Sport Smart.

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How long can you stay underwater with a full face snorkel mask?

Full face snorkels cover the head and face, with a recommendation of only 2 minutes spent diving underwater.

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Tried & tested: Subea Easybreath full face snorkel mask

Tried & tested: Subea Easybreath full face snorkel mask What better way to test a snorkel called ‘Easybreath’ than to plunge into the chilly waters of the Solent to discover how it copes with involuntary gasps and splutters? For our trial, we headed to Osborne Bay, just off Queen Vic’s bolthole on the Isle of Wight, on an uncharacteristically balmy early summer’s day. The mirror-calm water was inviting and the mercury was rising aboard the boat, but despite the positive omens the Bramblemet weather station was reporting a sea temperature of just 16.8° Celcius – more than enough to cause a sharp intake of breath by any measure. The first part of the experience demonstrated just how efficient is the snorkel’s ‘Dry-top’ system, courtesy of its on-board ‘buoy’. Article continues below… Credit: Nautibuoy Marine Credit: Marc Hillesheim Designed to prevent water coming in should the wearer take a gulp while underwater, the Subea Easybreath immediately locks off the air supply at the moment of submersion. Upon resurfacing, blow out and the buoy is released. Whether a trickle did get through on our test, it’s hard to say. For if it did, the automatic purge valve fitted to the mask did its job well – we did not notice any water ingress. Before jumping in, we had adjusted the Subea Easybreath’s head straps – which form an ‘X’ shape across the back of the head – so the mask sat comfortably without putting too much pressure on the face. A gentle tug of the adjusters was all that was necessary. We deliberately didn’t press the mask to the face, scuba diver style, upon entry to see what would happen – answer, nothing; the snorkel stayed put. The remainder of our trial was unremarkable; the Subea Easybreath performed admirably to the point where you could almost forget you were wearing it. Just one point to note is that we only tested the mask while surface swimming – the Dry-top system only works while the snorkel is vertical, meaning it may let in water during duck dives or free diving. Given that Subea Easybreath’s designer and retailer – the sports outlet Decathlon – spent seven years perfecting the product, its performance should not come as a surprise. Our only criticism is that despite the snorkel’s clever construction of separate areas for vision and breathing, we did experience some fogging initially, possibly due to the coldness of the water. So for our second plunge we tried rubbing a little washing up liquid into the inner lens, which fixed the problem completely. After that, everything went swimmingly… MBY rating: 5/5 Value rating: 5/5 Price: £24.99 (inc. VAT) Subea Easybreath deals Buy it now on Decathlon.co.uk Buy it now on argos.co.uk Note: We may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site, at no extra cost to you. This doesn’t affect our editorial independence.

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Are Full Face Snorkel Masks Safe? (Read This Before You …

Are Full Face Snorkel Masks Safe? (Read This Before You Buy One)How safe are full face snorkel masks and are they dangerous for snorkelers to use?The drowning of a snorkeler in Hawaii, who was wearing a full face snorkel mask at the time, has led the industry to question the safety of these masks. Since easy breath full face masks have become extremely popular among tourists, this has led the industry to investigate whether using full face snorkel masks is dangerous.So are full face snorkel masks safe or are they dangerous to use? Full face snorkel masks are dangerous because of the “dead Space” and the potential for the build-up of CO2 inside the mask. Deaths of snorkelers have been linked to full face snorkel masks, which is more likely to happen if you buy a cheap, poorly made mask or if these masks are used under duress.The best way to do more diving and snorkelling is to book yourself on a scuba diving liveaboard. You can check the latest and best deals on liveaboards using the following window:But if you buy a trusted brand of full face snorkel mask, plus if you swim slowly and don’t exert yourself on the surface and breathe normally, the safety issue shouldn’t occur.Like most things available buy on the market there are good products and bad products. If you buy well, you should be okay. But be aware that full face snorkel masks have their limitations. For example, you won’t to be able to surface dive or use this mask type for scuba diving.What are the risks and limitations of the snorkel mask?There are a number of limitations or disadvantages to a snorkel mask that you need to consider before you buy one.These include certain safety concerns as already mentioned above. Some worry about the potential build up of CO2 or carbon dioxide. This is particularly true if you use it to do more strenuous swimming.The limitations and potential disadvantages are as follows:Full face snorkel mask are they safe or are they dangerous?Snorkelling isn’t classed as a dangerous sport, unlike scuba diving. However, there has been a snorkeling fatality of a woman who drowned using a full face snorkel mask whilst snorkeling off Big Island in Hawaii.Whilst the cause of her death is not known fully, it is confirmed that she was wearing a full-face snorkeling mask when the incident happened.In an article in the Honolulu Civil Beat, Guy Cooper, the woman’s husband, raised concerns about the role of the full-face snorkeling mask his wife had been wearing.Cooper said that a surfer had found his wife floating on her back in Pohoiki Bay, Hawaii, with the mask partially pulled up over her nose. “That tells me she was in trouble and tried to get the damn thing off — too late,” he said.However, before rushing to conclusions on this, in the same article, it’s reported that between 2006 and 2015 there were 149 snorkeling-related deaths in Hawaii.There’s no specific statistic to show how many of these were as a result of using full face snorkel masks. It’s unlikely to be many, as the Tribord Easybreath snorkel mask was only released in 2014.The inability to swim quickly whilst snorkeling using a full face snorkel maskThe next disadvantage is the inability to swim quickly whilst wearing a full face snorkeling mask. The way the…

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11 Best Full Face Snorkel Masks in 2022 [+ buying tips] – DIVEIN

Full Face Snorkel Masks Full Face Snorkel Mask Buyer’s guide Earlier models had the problem of allowing exhaled air to circulate in the mask, leading to hazardous health scenarios. The Tribord was among the first full face masks to design an output for a snorkeler’s breath. As we can see with the Oceanreef Aria with Walkie-Talkie, these masks have developed quite a bit since, incorporating allergy-friendly silicone and better snorkel attachments. Buying a full face snorkel mask requires some attention, as there are a variety of sizes, shapes and materials. While past experience from a scuba mask is worth applying it’s another thing when it encapsulates the whole face. It is important to find a mask which fits your face as it will prevent water entering if the mask is too big, or prevent discomfort if the mask is too small and tight. Luckily, we have done the work for you. Here are our top tips and things to consider when purchasing your full face snorkel mask. Full Face Snorkel Mask Fit As full face snorkel masks cover the entire face it is important to select one that is the right size. A mask that is too big will let water in. It’s possible to compensate by opening one’s jaw, but that’s pretty tiring–as our editor can attest. To measure your face size you will need a tape measure, or piece of string. You will then need to measure from your eyebrows down to your chin. This will give you the length of your face which will help you choose the correct size for the best fit. Most full face snorkel masks have adjustable straps which will allow you to adjust the mask to fit your face snug. The silicon skirting on the masks will also help with comfort, preventing any water entering your mask. If water enters into your mask whilst you are using it, then it is advisable to tighten the straps. If this does not help you will benefit from buying another size. The right size of full face snorkel mask ensures ultimate comfort whilst snorkeling. Materials When purchasing a mask it is also important to note the materials and features of each mask. Most masks have an in-built silicon skirting, this skirting provides extra comfort as well as ensuring that no water enters the masks. The silicon skirting provides an airtight mask. For those with sensitive skin hypoallergenic silicon skirts will be more comfortable and will minimise any irritation which may occur whilst snorkelling. It is also important to look at the features in the snorkel. A dry top snorkel will prevent water entering into the mask via the snorkel. It will keep the inside of the mask dry. A wave guard will also ensure no water can enter the mask. Snorkeling without a wave guard, or dry snorkel will be uncomfortable as water will enter the mask and fill it, meaning it will need removing an emptying throughout your snorkelling. Most full face snorkel masks are made with a combination of plastics, some are more durable and heavy-duty than others. This will make them more practical when…

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Full Face Snorkel Mask any good? – Maui Forum – TripAdvisor

Full Face Snorkel Mask any good? – Maui Forum 8. Re: Full Face Snorkel Mask any good? 5 years ago Most people seem to be pretty happy with the full face masks. The general concept has been around at least since the early 60’s, but AFAIK Tribord was the first to promote a modern version targeted at real snorkelers instead of as a kids’ toy. As such, I think that the favorable reviews tend to be more about the Tribords, since they’ve been available a bit longer. I’ve seen a few negative opinions about the Tribord, but perhaps the knockoffs are more likely to get negative reviews. I have seen a couple of comments from people who felt they weren’t getting enough air, but I don’t recall if those mentioned the brand or if they were really about enough *air* or users being inadequately oxygenated as a result of recycling air in the dead space. My personal opinion is that they’re largely a crutch. Kind of like using training wheels or a tricycle because you can’t, or won’t bother to, master the skill of riding a two wheel bike. From what I’ve seen Tribord has targeted most or even all of their marketing toward people who have an issue with traditional equipment. That said, I think Tribord at least understands snorkeling and did legitimate work to develop their version, and from the first time I saw anything about them used an insert with intake/exhaust valves to reduce dead air space and minimize the amount of air that’s just shuttled back and forth (that happens a bit with regular snorkels, too, and even in your trachea). If some of the knockoffs don’t (or didn’t) have that insert it strikes me as a dead giveaway that they’re produced by morons who don’t have much of a clue about snorkeling but saw a chance to make a quick buck from the demand. A quick check with Amazon seems to indicate that as of now all of them, regardless of price, have the insert, though I’ve got no idea whether or not they’ve all got similar effectiveness at maximizing air exchange. As for the article, it’s got some good info, but I think it’s also got several things that are poorly expressed if not incorrect, leading off with the idea that snorkeling gear will let you breathe under water, which I would suggest is quite different than just being able to breathe at the surface without lifting your face above the water. Worse, it implies that there’s no dead air space or chance for CO2 buildup with a traditional snorkel. Anything that adds space between your mouth or nose and unconfined air adds dead airspace; full face masks just increase the amount of dead air space compared to traditional snorkels. And then there’s the implication that low price automatically makes a mask less safe; that insert requires a bit more material and a minor increase in assembly, but that doesn’t mean that cost is more…

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Best Full Face Snorkel Mask in 2022 | Top 7 Full Face Snorkel …

Full face snorkeling mask VS traditional snorkeling mask

Full face snorkeling mask VS traditional snorkeling mask – Maldives Forum 22. Re: Full face snorkeling mask VS traditional snorkeling mask 4 years ago Personally, I prefer the “traditional” mask on every occasion. Having tried the full-face mask during a two-week holiday at Lux South Ari ( including whale shark search, turtle observation, everyday snorkeling ), I remorsefully returned to my traditional masks on the next vacations. The full-face mask disables you to dive, swim fastly, against the current and in choppy seas, and from my experience, it gets foggy and is not properly closing. The only advantage is the slightly better view (bigger ankle) you have. My traditional mask does not get foggy at all, perhaps at the beginning of the snorkel, when the amplitude between water and skin temperature is too high it can happen. But in this case, spit and some water helps immediately and guarantees long-time fog-free snorkeling. For timid people and those, who just begun snorkeling, I think the full-fask mask is a valuable alternative, but once you become more confident in deeper water and enrichen your experience, I would always advice to switch to a “traditional” mask. But of course, opinions differ on that…. Edited: 4 years ago

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Top Tips for Choosing the Right Mask – Liveaboard.com

Choosing the Right Mask Top Tips for Choosing the Right Mask When it comes to buying dive and snorkelling kit, one of the most important pieces of equipment to own is the right mask. Not only does the right mask allow you to see marine life underwater clearly, it is also vital for being able to see hand signals and for reading gauges when scuba diving. Before going any further, it is important to remember that snorkelling and scuba diving masks are NOT the same and snorkel masks must not be used for diving. Snorkel masks are generally made of affordable materials, such as rubber, and often have plastic lenses, which are perfectly adequate for shallow water use. There are single and double lens snorkel masks available and even a variety of full-face snorkel masks to choose from. Full face snorkel masks are gaining popularity thanks to their unique curved lens that gives an uninterrupted 180-degree view for the wearer. They also allow the snorkeler to breathe through their nose or mouth, which is helpful for nervous snorkelers who are new to breathing in the water. Dive masks are made of higher quality materials, such as silicone and shatterproof glass, and are designed specifically for scuba diving. Silicone is more pliable than rubber and forms a better face seal. Dive masks undergo rigorous testing to ensure they function correctly under pressure at depth and there are a number of considerations to take when choosing the right mask. How to Choose the Right Dive Mask Before even stepping foot in a dive shop, it worth taking time to consider the type of diving you’ll be doing and what is most important to you; be that a wide field of vision, minimal glare, or a mask that is easily recognisable amongst others diving kit. It is also important to consider if you intend to use your mask for travelling. There are a variety of dive masks available, such as technical diving masks and masks perfect for traveling light. Knowing what your intended use is makes it a lot easier to make the right choice from the start. Mask Cost There are dive masks available to suit all budgets and they typically cost from 50 USD up to over 1,000 USD for some full-face diving masks. Whilst it’s important not to buy a cheap supermarket snorkel mask for use as a dive mask, the price tag isn’t the most important factor when choosing a mask. If cost is a concern, consider buying a second-hand mask from your local dive club and test it out beforehand. Products recommended or used by other divers can help when selecting the right mask and at the right price. Mask Fit If cost isn’t the most important factor, what is? The fit of the mask. The most important consideration when choosing a dive mask is always how it fits. A well-fitting mask will prevent water entering the mask and ensure a comfortable dive without the need to repeatedly clear the mask. People come in all shapes and sizes and there are many masks to choose from that account for different face shapes, head sizes, and nose shapes. The nose enclosure, or nose pocket, is important when considering fit. A flexible nose pocket allows divers to pinch their nose and equalize easily, whilst the right shape prevents water from entering the mask under the nose. This is especially important for helping to prevent panic…

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