Best Ultralight Tents of 2022 — CleverHiker



Last Updated on June 5, 2022

Camo Zpacks Duplex backpacking tent, the best ultralight shelter of 2022, in front of a mountain range

The Best Backpacking Tents of 2022: One through Six-Person Tents for All Hikers

Picking out one of 2022’s best backpacking tents for your gear list is no small task. Because, in the wild and unforgiving backcountry, your tent is the only thing protecting you from the wind, rain, and critters that await outside.

That’s why we’ve carefully chosen the 11 best backpacking tents on the market and given you a detailed rundown of each. From budget to high-end, one-person to six-person, minimalist to full-featured, freestanding to trekking pole — our tent recommendations run the gamut to suit every type of backpacker.

And, because we’re gear nerds, we’ve analyzed each product for seven essential factors: weight, floor dimensions, capacity, primary material, tent style, weather resistance, and price.

We’ve also recommended four top-notch sets of tent stakes and put together a list of helpful add-on accessories that can maximize your tent’s potential. Much like the shelters on this list, we’ve got you covered.

So, whether you’re a thru-hiker looking for a one-man ultralight shelter or a family of five searching for their next backcountry home, we hope you find exactly what you’re after.

Ready to dive into the best backpacking tents of 2022?

Let’s do it.

Contents

BEST BACKPACKING TENTS:
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. Best Overall Backpacking Tent: Zpacks Duplex
2. Best Freestanding Tent: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2
3. Best Ultralight Tent: Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 2
4. Sub-$100 Buy: River Country Products Trekker 2.2
5. Sub-$200 Buy: REI Passage 2
6. Best Four-Season Option: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3
7. Ultralight One-Person Shelter: Zpacks Altaplex
8. Popular for Two People: Nemo Dragonfly 2
9. Lightweight Three-Person Tent: MSR Mutha Hubba NX 3
10. Sturdy Four-Person Tent: Marmot Tungsten 4
11. Spacious Haven for Families: MSR Habitude 6
12. Best Ultralight Tarp: Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp
13. Tent Stakes We Recommend
14. Other Useful Tent Accessories
15. Parameters We Use to Rate Tents
16. Dial in the Rest of Your Kit
17. Final Thoughts: Best Backpacking Tents
18. More Hiking & Backpacking Resources

Best Overall Backpacking Tent
Zpacks Duplex + Optional Flex Kit Add-On

Grey Zpacks Duplex ultralight backpacking tent

MSRP: $649
Weight: 1 lb 3 oz | 539 grams
Floor Dimensions: 90″ x 45″
Capacity: 2-person
Main Material: DCF
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? No, but can be with Flex Kit
The Good:
Extremely lightweight, reliable, fantastic weather resistance, doesn’t stretch or wet out
The Not-So-Good:
Pricey, difficult setup

If you’ve backpacked regularly, you’ve likely seen a Zpacks Duplex or two dotting the landscape. Why? Because this cutting-edge backpacking tent is the best option on the 2022 market, and it’s not a secret anymore.

I’ve learned from experience that it doesn’t get much lighter, more compact, and weather-resistant than this tent. I’ve hunkered down in my Duplex during torrential downpours, 100-mph wind gusts, dust storms, and more – all the while staying dry and comfortable each time. Thanks to its DCF material, this tent is 100% waterproof and won’t ever sag or stretch out, even in the worst weather. It’s spacious for one person, pretty snug for two, and would work perfectly for a single hiker and their dog.

So, why am I recommending a trekking pole backpacking tent as the best option overall? Because it can transform into a freestanding tent with the optional 10.2-oz Flex Kit add-on. This clever upgrade gives backpackers the versatility to add poles to their setup when they expect tough conditions to stake down, fear volatile weather, or just want a little extra room to stretch out inside.

The Duplex is a high-performance tent that rings in at $649, and the Flex Kit is $125. These prices are a bit spendy, but for those ready to slash their base weight and step up their backpacking game, the splurge could be well worth the investment. If you want a quality two-person freestanding tent at a more approachable price, check out the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 or the Nemo Dragonfly 2.

Other Versions: Hexamid, Altaplex, Triplex

SEE PRICE ON ZPACKS

Best Freestanding Backpacking Tent
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2

Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 shelter

MSRP: $450
Weight: 3 lb 2 oz | 1.42 kg
Floor Dimensions: 88″ x 52″/42″
Capacity: 2-person
Main Material: Silnylon
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Vestibules double as awnings, spacious internal storage, lightweight, great weather resistance
The Not-So-Good:
Could be cramped for two people

If trekking pole tents like the Duplex aren’t quite your style, the freestanding Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 would probably make you a very happy camper. It’s one of the most lightweight, comfortable, and well-designed tents of 2022.

The Copper Spur is chock full of incredible features that can’t be measured in ounces or inches. For example, it has two built-in awnings that can be held up by trekking poles to expand your living space and create shelter from the sun and rain. Its mesh above-head-and-foot storage is massive and will keep your toiletries, stinky clothes, and other backpacking essentials suspended off the ground. It packs small, holds up well in strong wind, and ventilates well. Like the Duplex, the Copper Spur HV UL2 is roomy for one person and cozy for two. It’s a hell of a tent.

It’s tough to find any nitpicks with the Copper Spur HV UL2, as everyone I’ve come across who owns this tent, absolutely loves it. Some reviewers say they feel a little cramped in this tent, so if its dimensions are a concern, look into the HV UL3, which offers an extra foot-and-a-half of floor width.

Though I’m quite smitten with my Duplex, if I ever were to switch to a freestanding tent, the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 would undoubtedly be the one. It’ll work perfectly for backpackers who want to keep their base weight down but who also want to enjoy a few small luxuries along the way.

Other Versions: HV UL1, HV UL3, HV UL4

SEE PRICE ON REI

SEE PRICE ON AMAZON

Best Pure Ultralight Backpacking Tent
Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 2

White DCF ultralight pyramid backpacking shelter for two people

MSRP: $735
Weight: 1 lb 3 oz | 531 g
Weight w/ Netting & Floor: 2 lb 9 oz | 1.16 kg
Floor Dimensions: 107″ x 83″
Capacity: 2-person
Main Material: DCF
Weather Resistance: 4-season
Freestanding? No
The Good:
Extremely spacious, excellent weather resistance, very lightweight and packable
The Not-So-Good:
Expensive, doesn’t come with bug netting or floor, must lash trekking poles together to pitch

Perhaps you’re intrigued by the incredibly lightweight Zpacks Duplex from earlier, but you’re a tad wary of its tight dimensions for two people. Well, as luck would have it, the Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 2 exists for backpackers who share your concerns.

Made entirely of stretch-proof and waterproof DCF, the UltaMid 2 is crazy packable and boasts double the floor area than the Duplex. You’ll have much more headroom, too, so long as you’re not trying to hang out near the edges of the tent. Its aerodynamic pyramid design drastically reduces wind drag and easily sheds rain and snow, offering dependable weather resistance in all four seasons. Because this tent is so roomy, sleeping two people inside won’t be an issue whatsoever. Hell, throw a dog in the mix too. Why not?

So, why didn’t we recommend the UltaMid 2 above all others? For starters, it doesn’t come standard with bug netting or a floor, which cost a whopping $405 to add on and double the tent’s weight. You’ll need to lash two trekking poles together to reach the proper height to set this tent up, so keep that in mind, as well. Other than that, it’s hard not to get excited over this absolute beauty of an ultralight shelter.

The UltaMid 2 is a high-end piece of gear that’ll thrive for serious backpackers and thru-hikers who crave a lightweight, packable, and roomy four-season tent. If you can afford it, this tent will be your loyal companion from day one, especially if you don’t require bug netting or a floor.

Other Versions: UltaMid 4

SEE PRICE ON HYPERLITE MOUNTAIN GEAR

Budget Trekking Pole Tent Under $100
River Country Products Trekker 2.2

Green budget beginner trekking pole tent under $100

MSRP: $57
Weight: 3 lb | 1.36 kg
Floor Dimensions: 84″ x 60″
Capacity: 2-person
Main Material: PU Coated Polyester
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? No
The Good:
Very affordable, pretty lightweight for its living area, good ventilation, seam-sealed
The Not-So-Good:
Only one door, material will absorb some water after heavy rain

I know, I know. The first three tents I recommended aren’t exactly cheap value buys. That’s why I slipped in the Trekker 2.2 as the best budget option on this list. I wanted to show you that not all backpacking gear has to break the bank.

At 5′ x 7′ of interior space, this a-frame trekking pole tent can work as a roomy solo shelter or a cozy refuge for two. Its thoughtful large mesh sidewalls will keep bugs out, provide great ventilation, and also catch any condensation that might drip down from the tent’s main polyester shell. Its seams are factory-sealed, and it comes with a set of eight ultralight stakes, which is pretty great for a tent this affordable.

This tent will not be as lightweight, packable, or as meticulously engineered as many other products on this list, but you probably knew that already. It only has a door at one end, which isn’t a huge deal but could make camping partners feel a little claustrophobic. Its polyester material will absorb some water and might sag during heavy periods of rain, which is to be expected.

The goal with a budget recommendation is to put you in a tent that’ll keep you dry and comfortable in the backcountry for under $100, and the Trekker 2.2 will do just that.

Other Versions: Trekker 1, Trekker 1A, Trekker 3

SEE PRICE ON AMAZON

Beginner Budget Tent Under $200
REI Passage 2

REI Passage 2, a cheap shelter under $200

MSRP: $159
Weight: 5 lb 4 oz | 2.37 kg
Floor Dimensions: 88″ x 52″
Capacity: 2-Person
Main Material: Polyester
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Affordable, Easy set up, durable, reliable
The Not-So-Good:
Heavy, bulky

To be honest, I recommended most of the tents on this list with intermediate to advanced backpackers in mind. Don’t worry, though, newbies. I haven’t forgotten about you. Here’s a budget two-person beginner tent I think might be right up your alley: the REI Passage 2.

When I first started backpacking, I sported the strikingly similar REI Camp Dome 2. It was effortless to set up, very comfortable, and stood up to a wide variety of bad weather. I trusted this tent endlessly throughout my college years and used it for countless nights of car camping and backpacking. It was the exact shelter I needed to fall in love with backpacking and start my never-ending journey into the world of ultralight gear.

Sure, it weighs a couple more pounds than the other two-person tents on this list and won’t pack down quite as small, but it’s durable, very easy to set up, and the price is right. It’s not super groundbreaking, and it definitely won’t turn any heads on the trail, but who cares?

If you’re ready to dabble in the world of backpacking, the sub-$200 REI Passage 2 is a great value buy and will be all you need to get hooked. And once you are hooked, you just might allow yourself to bite the bullet and spring for one of the more luxurious tents on this list.

Other Versions: Passage 1, Passage 3, Half Dome 4

SEE PRICE ON REI

Rock-Solid Four-Season Backpacking Tent
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 Expedition

Red Big Agnes four-season backpacking shelter

MSRP: $550
Weight: 6 lb 3 oz | 2.80 kg
Floor Dimensions: 90″ x 70″/62″
Capacity: 3-person
Main Material: Silpoly
Weather Resistance: 4-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Built for all four seasons, lots of pockets inside, large vestibules
The Not-So-Good:
Breathability could be an issue if not properly pitched

Sometimes the weather can get so gnarly that a three-season tent simply isn’t going to get the job done. If you suspect that’s the case for your upcoming trip, give the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 Expedition a nice long look.

Big Agnes wasn’t lying when they described this as “a beefed-up, burly addition to the award-winning Copper Spur HV series.” While it shares many of the features that make the aforementioned HV UL2 outstanding, it also utilizes burlier poles built to handle high winds, nonstop rain, and heavy snowfall. Further, it comes equipped with highly weather-resistant Dominico polyester ripstop, which will shed downpours and stifle polar gusts with ease. The interior boasts spacious dual doors, ten different pockets to stash gear, and guy loops for increased stability on those extra windy days. This tent is an absolute beast.

With such impenetrable fabric, breathability won’t be excellent, but proper venting techniques should fix any condensation issues that arise. Unlike the HV UL series, the HV Expedition doesn’t have the option to convert its large vestibules into awnings and expand its living area. That’s no big deal, though, as this tent is meant for ‘awning weather’ to begin with.

If you plan on visiting a more touch-and-go backpacking destination weather-wise — think: Alaska, Iceland, Patagonia, New Zealand — you need a rock-solid four-season tent that leaves nothing to chance. If that’s the case, the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 Expedition was built specifically for your style of adventure and should keep you protected no matter how bad the forecast is.

Other Versions: HV 2 Expedition

SEE PRICE ON REI

SEE PRICE ON AMAZON

Crazy Light One-Person Trekking Pole Tent
Zpacks Altaplex

Lightweight Zpacks Altaplex ultralight shelter for tall hikers

MSRP: $625
Weight: 15.4 oz | 437 g
Floor Dimensions: 90″ x 36″
Capacity: 1-person
Main Material: DCF
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? No
The Good:
Incredibly lightweight and packable, great weather resistance, built for tall hikers
The Not-So-Good:
Expensive, pretty snug

If you’re passing up a roomier two-person tent for a one-person model, you might just be trying to shed a few ounces and keep your base weight as low as possible. That’s why I’ve included a solo ultralight trekking pole tent to the mix with the Zpacks Altaplex.

Weighing in at a ridiculous 15.4 ounces, the Altaplex is about as lightweight of a fully-enclosed solo shelter as you can find on the 2022 market. Sure, it’s a pretty niche tent that only ultralight backpackers are likely to consider, but I couldn’t resist. Why? Because it’ll lighten your load on the trail significantly while keeping you dry, safe, and comfortable in the process. Its lofty ceiling accommodates hikers up to 6’4″ tall, and its waterproof DCF material won’t ever stretch, sag, or let you down.

Much like other one-person tents, the interior space inside your Altaplex is only big enough to hold your sleeping pad, sleeping bag, and a few other essentials. You’ll likely need to stash your backpack and everything else outside of the tent, underneath its storm door. And, yes, this tent is expensive, just like all the other DCF products on this list. I wonder if that fabric will ever become more affordable?

As I mentioned earlier, this tent will only attract the type of backpacker or thru-hiker passionate about counting ounces and scoring some serious weight savings. If that’s you, this may be the perfect one-person tent. For everyone else, the Nemo Dragonfly 1 or the Copper Spur HV UL1 might be more your style.

Other Versions: Hexamid, Duplex, Triplex

SEE PRICE ON ZPACKS

Tried-and-True Two-Man Backpacking Tent
NEMO Dragonfly 2

Nemo Dragonfly 2-person backpacking tent

MSRP: $400
Weight: 3 lb 2 oz | 1.41 kg
Floor Dimensions: 88″ x 50″/45″
Capacity: 2-person
Main Material: Silnylon
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Spacious interior, lots of storage under large vestibules, great ventilation
The Not-So-Good:
No awnings like the HV UL2

Though I recommended the Copper Spur HV UL2 above all other freestanding tents, I’ve heard nothing but great things about the NEMO Dragonfly 2 from fellow backpackers. It has an impressive set of features and definitely deserves all the praise. Don’t overlook it.

Highlighted by a crossbar and split main pole, the Dragonfly 2’s clever structure creates ample room for two campers to comfortably sit up and share the tent. Its far-reaching vestibules stake down to make plenty of space outside the tent for larger gear, and its spacious gear loft and side pockets work to stash smaller essentials inside. Those vestibules can also be manipulated easily to create great ventilation, so condensation shouldn’t ever be much of an issue.

But the Dragonfly 2’s vestibules cannot be manipulated into awnings like the HV UL2, which is the main difference between the two tents. Both options are almost equals in terms of weight, dimensions, and weather resistance, but the HV UL2’s ability to create a cozy lounging area outside the tent makes it slightly more appealing than the Dragonfly 2 in my eyes.

Regardless of what I think, the NEMO Dragonfly 2 is undoubtedly one of the very best two-person backpacking tents on the market in 2022. It’s a comfortable, spacious, and well-ventilated tent that would make an intelligent addition to anyone’s backpacking gear list.

Other Versions: Dragonfly 1, Dragonfly 3

SEE PRICE ON REI

SEE PRICE ON AMAZON

Lightweight Three-Person Shelter
MSR Mutha Hubba NX 3

MSR Mutha Hubba three man tent for camping and hiking

MSRP: $550
Weight: 4 lb 13 oz
Floor Dimensions: 84″ x 68″
Capacity: 3-person
Main Material: Silnylon
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Lightweight for its size, does great in high winds, pole and hubs are singular
The Not-So-Good: 
Could be a little tight for three adults

Whether you’re backpacking in a group of three, or you’re a couple who wants to bring their beloved dog along, the MSR Mutha Hubba might be the compact and sturdy tent you’ve been looking for.

I met multiple backpackers while hiking in Patagonia with Hubba NX series tents, and everyone I spoke to raved about their performance in the region’s high winds. Considering how well it performs in gnarly gusts, this tent is also very lightweight and packable once its poles, rainfly, and main body are divided amongst three hikers. And, though it may look complex at first, the pole and hub structure on this tent is held together as a singular unit, making pitching the tent straightforward. It’s no wonder why Hubba NX series tents are a staple in the lightweight backpacking community.

Depending on your personal space boundaries, this tent could be a pretty tight squeeze for three full-grown adults, so I’d look towards the Papa Hubba NX if you want an MSR tent with a tad more personal space. I did also meet a hiker who told me the rainfly on his Hubba NX let in a little moisture after an extraordinarily heavy night of rain, but he didn’t seem to be too bothered by it at all.

The MSR Mutha Hubba NX would be a sound investment for backpackers who want a lightweight three-person tent with optimal wind resistance. It’s an extremely popular option amongst backpackers worldwide and could thrive for you as well.

Other Versions: Hubba NX 1, Hubba Hubba NX 2, Papa Hubba NX 4

SEE PRICE ON REI

SEE PRICE ON AMAZON

Sturdy Four-Person Fortress
Marmot Tungsten 4

Green Marmot Tungsten 4 man backpacking shelter

MSRP: $366
Weight: 8 lb 7 oz | 3.83 kg
Floor Dimensions: 93″ x 82″
Capacity: 4-person
Main Material: Polyester taffeta
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Simple to set up, large doors, excellent weather resistance
The Not-So-Good:
A little heavy, could be a bit tight for four people

The Marmot Tungsten 4 is one of the top-rated four-person backpacking tents on the 2022 market and will safely shelter you and your crew at a great value.

The Tungsten 4 is extremely simple to set up for starters, and dividing up its weight to carry among four hikers should be a breeze. Thanks to its two large doors on either side, getting in and out of this tent without disturbing your buddies shouldn’t be an issue, either. Users rave about its top-notch weather resistance and say it stands strong in the face of heavy winds and rain. Marmot has a reputation for engineering outstanding products, and I have no reason to believe this tent is any different.

It’s hard to find any big nitpicks with the Tungsten 4; it’s a really solid shelter. Sure, its interior will be a bit snug for four adults, but space shouldn’t be an issue if your gear is stashed properly under its large vestibules. One reviewer did complain that he found the vestibule fabric to be a bit loose and added that using the zipper with one hand was difficult. Petty gripes aside, this tent checks all the boxes.

I believe Marmot Tungsten 4 would work perfectly for small groups or families looking for a dependable four-person tent that can stand up to bad weather. This tent is a top-rated option in the backpacking industry and is a tremendous value buy. What else could you ask for?

Other Versions: Tungsten 1P, Tungsten 2P, Tungsten 3P

SEE PRICE ON BACKCOUNTRY

SEE PRICE ON REI

Spacious Six-Person Family Tent
MSR Habitude 6

MSR Habitude 6 family-sized tent

MSRP: $600
Weight: 13 lb 6 oz | 6.01 kg
Floor Dimensions: 120″ x 100″
Capacity: 6-person
Main Material: Polyester taffeta
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? Yes
The Good:
Comes with a porch light, standing-height inside, good weather resistance
The Not-So-Good:
Heavy, proper ventilation is tough to achieve when fully packed

We’ve now arrived at the most family-friendly shelter of the bunch, the MSR Habitude 6. Boasting generous floor space and an integrated porch light, this behemoth would work perfectly for a family of backpackers or small groups who want to share the same living area.

Dubbed a “standing-height haven” by MSR, the Habitude’s ceiling is lofty and can accommodate guests up to six feet tall. The floor space of this tent is spacious enough to hold up to six sleeping pads and some stray gear. Can it house six adults? That’ll be a tight squeeze. But two adults and four children? Bring it on. Wind and rain should never be much of an issue, as the weather resistance on this tent is top-notch.

At over 13 pounds, some might view the Habitude 6 as more of a car camping tent than a backpacking tent. But if the tent is distributed amongst the group — one adult carrying the rainfly, one carrying the tent body, and three children carrying a set of poles each — weight shouldn’t be an issue. Packed full of people with the rainfly on, the interior could get a little clammy, so keep that in mind.

If you’re a family with multiple young children, the MSR Habitude 6 could be the optimal tent to introduce the little ones to the wonderful world of backpacking. It’s spacious, comfortable, and could act as the perfect shelter for you and yours to get to know the great outdoors together.

Other Versions: Habitude 4

SEE PRICE ON BACKCOUNTRY

SEE PRICE ON REI

Now that I’ve recommended a handful of top-notch backpacking tents, I wanted to throw in one ultralight tarp as a bonus. This tarp weighs less than any of the tents on this list, is functional enough for several scenarios, and offers backpackers a more purist approach to conquering trails.

Maybe you’re not ready for a tarp today, and that’s just fine. I just wanted to plant the idea in your head now to help ease along your transition into a gram-counting ultralight backpacking freak.

Best Ultralight Backpacking Tarp
Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp

Hyperlite Mountain Gear one-man ultralight DCF Flat Tarp

MSRP: $365
Weight: 8.9 oz | 251 g
Tarp Dimensions: 102″ x 102″
Capacity: 1-person
Main Material: DCF
Weather Resistance: 3-season
Freestanding? No
The Good:
Super lightweight, very durable DCF, very adaptable
The Not-So-Good:
Expensive, more exposed than tents, takes a bit of a learning curve

Let’s jump back to Hyperlite Mountain Gear, one of the most trusted brands in the ultralight industry. Their 8.9 oz DCF Flat Tarp is a shining example of how less is more in the world of lightweight backpacking.

This minimalist tarp is more adaptable than any of the tents on this list, meaning it can pitch in various ways to suit the weather and environment around it. It weighs half a pound, packs down to the size of a water bottle, and has 16 double-bonded tie-outs, so you know your pitch will always be taut. Backpacking with this tarp is an exercise in simplicity.

But, with that simplicity comes a few sacrifices. For starters, there’s no bug netting included with this tarp. You must wear a head net, add a bug net insert, or bring a bivy along to keep the bugs at bay. This tarp also won’t always offer 100% protection from rain, wind, and snow, but you can get pretty close once you’ve mastered your pitches. The learning curve for setting up tarps is pretty steep, as well, but practice and persistence will get you where you need to be.

I recommend the DCF Flat Tarp to anyone ready to make a bold move save some serious weight. No, tarps aren’t for everyone, but they might work perfectly for those willing to get more intimate with nature and adapt to a more minimalist style of backpacking. Tarp life might not be easy at first, but it could be very rewarding in the end.

Want to know more about backpacking tarps? Check out Greenbelly’s extensive guide for the tips, recommendations, and the ten best tarp configurations.

Other Versions: Flat Tarp 8′ x 10′

SEE PRICE ON HYPERLITE MOUNTAIN GEAR

Tent Stakes I Recommend

Getting your hands on one of 2022’s best backpacking tents or tarps is a great idea, but if you don’t properly anchor it into the ground with reliable tent stakes, you’re doing it wrong.

Further, any trekking pole tent or tarp on this list will not stand up without first securing its guylines into the earth with stakes. Freestanding tents will flap around in strong winds and might let in precipitation if they’re not properly staked down either.

Do your tent justice and anchor it down with a set of stakes that suits your backpacking style and the weather conditions you anticipate on your trip. Here are my top picks:

Red MSR tent stake

Best Overall Tent Stake: MSR Groundhog

If you’re searching for a do-it-all tent stake that’ll work in most conditions, look no further than the MSR Groundhog. I own these sturdy stakes and pack them on trips when I anticipate high winds. They’ve stayed anchored in violent gusts and haven’t failed me in loose soil, either.

Black Zpacks ultralight carbon fiber tent stake

Best Ultralight Tent Stake: Zpacks Carbon Fiber

The MSR Groundhogs I mentioned above are terrific but might be overkill if you’re not expecting crazy weather. When conditions are looking good, I recommend the ultralight Zpacks Ultralight Carbon Fiber Stakes. They’re only .22 oz apiece, less than half the weight of the Groundhogs (.46 oz).

Red MSR tent stake for loose terrain, snow, and sand

Best Tent Stake for Loose Terrain: MSR Blizzard

Keeping your tent anchored atop sand, snow, ice, or gravelly earth can be a nightmare if you don’t have the correct stakes for the job. Grab the MSR Blizzard stakes if you’ll be camping in less-than-ideal conditions where the terrain is too loose to grip traditional stakes properly.

Budget tent stake from Amazon

Best Budget Tent Stake: All One Tech

Sometimes you’ve just got to save some cash. (Backpacking costs can add up, I get it.) Check out the All One Tech aluminum stakes if you’re looking for a reliable stake for a bargain. They’re $12 for a pack of 12, and, at .53 oz apiece, they weigh about the same as the MSR Groundhogs.

Tent Accessories I Recommend

Aside from tent stakes, there are several other accessories that can help maximize your tent’s capabilities if appropriately used. Take a look through the following gear and grab what’s missing from your kit so you don’t get left high and dry on your next backpacking trip.

Lightweight aluminum Montbell trekking pole

Trekking Poles: Montbell Alpine

You’ll need a quality set of sticks to keep your trekking pole tent standing upright, and a couple of these lightweight Montbell Alpines will do the job well. They’re sturdy enough to prevent slips and falls and will save your knees during ascents and descents, as well.

Grey DCF groundsheet/footprint with a yellow backpacking sleeping pad on top

Groundsheet/Footprint: Zpacks

I don’t use a groundsheet under my tent, but I’d have prevented a few aggravating pinhole leaks in my sleeping pad if I had. Use a footprint to add an extra layer of protection between your tent floor, your pad, and the pesky, pokey, prickly earth below.

Two rolls of black gear repair tape

Roll of paracord (or guylines) for shelters

Paracord/Guyline: Nite Ize Shine Line

If you need to upgrade your guylines or simply want to carry some lightweight paracord as a backup, check out the Nite Ize ShineLine. It weighs almost nothing, reflects light so you won’t trip over it, and has multiple other uses in the backcountry.

Green ultralight towel for wiping off tent condensation

Ultralight Towel: PackTowl

Pesky condensation will show up inside your tent from time to time, especially if it’s made of DCF. Use a fast-drying hand-sized microfiber towel to wipe down your damp tent before you pack it up and get back on the trail. Nobody wants to unpack a soggy tent.

Big Agnes gear loft for freestanding tents

Gear Loft: Big Agnes

A gear loft will suspend your belongings off of your grubby tent floor as you sleep and give you more interior space to stretch out and move around. I would carry a gear loft in my bag if I used a Big Agnes freestanding tent, but alas, I guess I’ll have to keep dreaming.

Parameters We Use to Analyze Backpacking Tents

Grey ultralight DCF shelter in front of a lake and a mountain range

There’s a lot of factors to consider when mulling over your next backpacking tent

I spend far more time than I’d like to admit poring over products before I buy them. Just like you, I want to make sure that my next significant investment in backpacking will be a perfect fit before I make my decision.

Though I haven’t slept in every shelter on this list, I have spent countless hours researching and scrutinizing the products I’ve never used. I’ve also backpacked alongside folks who own many of the products on this list, and I’ve picked their brains about what they love (and don’t love) about their gear.

Experience and opinion aside, I’ve also analyzed each product for the following seven measurable factors: weight, floor dimensions, capacity, primary material, weather resistance, tent style, and price. Because understanding these vital details will help you visualize a product in ways a photo never could.

Weight

Unless you hire a sherpa to lug your gear around, the weight of your pack matters and should be a significant factor when considering your next tent. The more your tent weighs, the heavier your pack will be and the slower you’ll move on the trail.

As an ultralight enthusiast, I recommend going with the lightest possible tent within your price range that’ll keep you dry, comfortable, and secure. I’ve backpacked with unnecessarily heavy gear, and have learned to save weight every chance you get.

Floor Dimensions

Each tent has its own unique floor dimensions, which will give you an idea of how much interior space to expect when it’s set up. To help visualize a tent’s floor space, measure out its dimensions on your floor, mark them off with tape or string, and lie down within them.

Tent height is another dimension to consider, especially if you’re on the taller side and often have issues bumping your head on the top of your tent. Measure your height when seated on your sleeping pad and reference it to the tent’s specs to get an idea of how comfortable you’ll be sitting up inside your tent.

Capacity

A tent’s floor dimensions directly play a part in how many people can sleep comfortably inside. The manufacturer decides a tent’s capacity, though, so pay more attention to the floor dimensions, as they’ll give you a better idea of exactly how much interior space you and your backpacking partners will have.

Each shelter on this list is rated to sleep between one and six people. I recommend sizing up to a bigger tent — for example, sleeping two people in a three-person tent — if you or your hiking partners get claustrophobic or like to stretch out while you sleep.

Main Material

All of the tents and tarps on this list are constructed from one of three types of materials. Here are the basic characteristics you need to know about each:

  • Dyneema Composite Fabric (DCF): DCF is an extraordinarily lightweight and completely waterproof composite material used for sailing and ultralight backpacking. It doesn’t stretch out or sag over time, but it is delicate and should be treated with care. DCF is the most expensive material on this list.
  • Silnylon: Made from nylon ‘impregnated’ with liquid silicone from both sides, silnylon is typically stronger and durable than DCF but not nearly as lightweight. It’ll sag and stretch slightly over time, especially in wet and/or windy conditions. Silnylon is significantly more affordable than DCF.
  • Polyester/Silpoly: Polyester and silpoly (polyester + silicone) are typically heavier than silnylon but are also more abrasion-resistant and affordable. Polyester/silpoly absorbs water more than silnylon and DCF, which leads to more sagging and longer dry-out times.

Weather Resistance

Nobody wants wind, rain, snow, sand, sleet, extreme temperatures, or anything else Mother Nature has in store to ruin their backpacking trip. Naturally, your tent’s materials and design will play a huge part in its ability to handle the weather and protect you from the elements.

The tents and tarps on this list are rated with either four-season or three-season weather resistance. Four-season tents are rated to protect you during winter conditions when you can expect significant snow, wind, and low temperatures. Three-season tents are rated to protect you in typical spring, summer, and fall conditions, but not the winter conditions listed above.

Freestanding vs. Trekking Pole

All of the tents and tarps on this last stand up one of two ways:

  • Freestanding: Included aluminum poles feed through the fabric of the tent to give it a dome-shaped structure and help it stand upright
  • Trekking Pole: One or two trekking poles act as a frame for the tent to help it stand along with tension from the guylines and stakes that anchor them into the ground

Freestanding tents are traditionally easier to set up than trekking pole tents but usually weigh more and take up more space in your backpack. Trekking pole tents are generally more lightweight and packable than freestanding tents but also tend to produce more condensation and provide less insulation.

Price

For most backpackers, cost comes into play when researching and buying that next tent. With options on this list running from $50 up to $750, there’s a wide range of ways to spend your hard-earned money.

Tents made from super lightweight (and pricey) DCF will inevitably cost more than tents made from nylon, silnylon, polyester, silpoly, and other materials. So, if you want a well-made ultralight tent made of DCF, get ready to shell out at least $650.

Dial in the Rest of Your Backpacking Kit

Ultralight backpacking gear list items laid across a wooden floor

Your backpacking gear list goes well beyond your tent

There’s a lot more that goes into backpacking than just your tent, its stakes, and a few helpful accessories. You’ll need to dial in the rest of your kit — your backpack, boots, sleeping pad, down jacket, etc. — if you want to have the best experience possible on the trail.

My quick advice is to keep your gear choices as lightweight, durable, and comfortable as possible. If you’d like to know more about how to do this, check out my 8.7-pound ultralight backpacking gear list. In this post, I review every single product I carry and give helpful advice on putting together a failproof kit of your own.

And if you don’t want to spend a crazy amount of money, head over to the article I wrote about budget backpacking gear. In this post, I piece together an entire backpacking gear list that weighs around 10 pounds and costs only $500. It’s tough to put together a brand-new ultralight kit for cheaper than that.

Which Backpacking Tent Will Anchor Your Trip?

Orange lightweight 2022 backpacking tent with a silhouette of mountains against a pre-dusk sky

Which tent do you have your eye on for the 2022 backpacking season?

If you’ve made it this far, I hope that means you’ve found the best backpacking tent possible for your 2022 season. If that’s the case, congratulations. You’ve just set yourself up for success from the moment you set up camp on your next overnighter.

If you didn’t find a tent you like, that’s okay too. Just remember this:

Fewer things are more important in the world of backpacking than a safe, comfortable, and dependable shelter. Mother Nature doesn’t pull any punches, so you’d better not either. Keep searching until you find a tent of tarp that has your back when you need it most.

Thanks for stopping by to check out the best backpacking tents of 2022. Do you have experience with any of these tents? Are there any questions I left unanswered? Which shelter do you have your eye on? Leave a comment, shoot me an email, or find me on the trail if you have any feedback. I’m all ears.

Cheers, and happy backpacking.

More Hiking & Backpacking Resources

FAQs

Who makes the best quality camping tents?

Best Camping Tents

  • REI Skyward 4.
  • REI Wonderland 4.
  • REI Half Dome SL 2+ & 3+
  • Eureka Space Camp 4.
  • Coleman Octagon 98.
  • REI Trail Hut 4.
  • Marmot Limestone 4P.
  • Caddis Rapid 6.

(Get More Info)

Who is the best tent manufacturer?

Here are our top picks for the best tent manufacturers:

  • Hilleberg.
  • Big Agnes.
  • MSR.
  • Vango.
  • The North Face.
  • Black Diamond.
  • Alpkit.
  • Nemo.

(Get More Info)

What is the toughest tent?

Heimplanet Mavericks Dome Tent The brand manufacturers some of the toughest tents on Earth, designed to withstand the harshest conditions. Its flagship Mavericks is a 55-pound multipurpose refuge with a 140-square-foot footprint large enough to be used as a basecamp for expedition teams venturing far, far off grid

(Get More Info)

What is the most water resistant tent?

Best Overall Waterproof Tents

  1. Coleman Dome Tent with Screen Room. 5/5 Overall Rating. …
  2. Wenzel 8 Person Klondike. …
  3. Coleman WeatherMaster 6 Screened Tent. …
  4. MSR Hubba Hubba NX. …
  5. Eureka Copper Canyon 4-6. …
  6. Marmot Tungsten Backpacking Tent 3. …
  7. Coleman Elite Sundome 6 Person Tent with LED Light System. …
  8. TETON Sports Mountain Ultra Tent.

(Get More Info)

Best Family Tents – Our Top Picks for 2023

Best Family Tents – Our Top Picks for 2023My family loves to camp, and with 6 of us, finding a family camping tent that can hold us all comfortably is not an easy task. During our search, we looked at all the tents we could find at the local camping and outdoor stores, as well as searching online reviews, to narrow our choices down to three of the best family tents for 2023.We ultimately ended up purchasing and using the Coleman Montana Family tent for our most recent trip to Yellowstone National Park.  Not only did it provide enough room to sleep 2 adults and 4 children comfortably, but it held up well during light rain and windy conditions that we experienced one night. We were also able to set it up in under 20 minutes and the kids helped too. The Coleman Montana Family tent is our recommendation as it’s served us well so far, but below are a few other family tents we were just as impressed with during our search. Last update on 2022-09-04 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising APIMy family’s recent camping trip to Yellowstone really opened up my eyes to what aspects and features of camping tents are important. Inside space, protection from the elements, ease of ingress/egress, and setup time all weighed heavily in our decision. Below are the top 3 family tents that we considered, but ultimately we chose the Coleman Montana. 1) Coleman Montana Family Tent (check price at Amazon) This 8 person tent measures 16ft x 7ft. You really have to see just how big this tent is in person, it’s impressive. The Coleman Montana fits my family of 6 perfectly with room to spare for our gear and clothes.It is constructed with Coleman’s Weather Tech System which welds all the seams to prevent water intrusion. We had rain one night on our trip and everything inside remained dry. It’s rated at a 15 minute setup time, which was around what we experience with the kids helping. Based on our experiences, everything about Coleman Montana is perfect for family use and is our recommendation for the best family tent for 2023. 2) Core Family Tent (check price at Amazon) We had a chance to look at the Core Family tent in person at our local outdoor store and really liked what we saw. It is slightly larger than the Coleman Montana at 16ft x 9ft and rated for 9 people.We thought the Coleman Montana felt slightly more durable and sturdier, but the price of the Core Family Tent is way cheaper. For a budget family tent, I wouldn’t hesitate putting the Core 9 person tent at the top of the list. 3) Ozark Trail XL Family Tent (check price at Amazon) The Ozark Trail line of tents are made in several different size options, but the one we considered most for our trip was the 10 person XL model. I figured more space is always better, and this tent is a whopping 20ft x 11ft. It’s one MASSIVE tent.Unfortunately I was never able to see this tent in person, but the reviews were mostly positive. Other than…

Start now

Best Camping Tents of 2022 | Switchback Travel

Switchback Travel | Best Camping Tents of 2022 Spacious, user-friendly, and feature-rich, camping tents are made for a relatively luxurious experience in the outdoors. Many of these behemoths offer enough room to set up cots or even chairs and a table for card games on a rainy day. For car campers who take a couple trips each year during the summer months, even the cheapest tents on this list should perform fine. For tougher weather conditions or more frequent use, it’s worth spending up for better materials and interior space. Below we break down the best camping tents of 2022. For more background information, see our comparison table and buying advice below the picks.   Our Team’s Camping Tent Picks Best Overall Camping Tent: The North Face Wawona 6 A Close Second (With Better Weather Protection): REI Co-op Base Camp 6 Best Budget Camping Tent: Coleman Skydome 6P Best Crossover Camping/Backpacking Tent: Marmot Tungsten 4P Best Overall Camping Tent 1. The North Face Wawona 6 ($475) Floor area: 86.1 sq. ft.Peak height: 80 in.Capacities: 4P, 6PWeight: 20 lbs. 15 oz.What we like: Open interior and massive vestibule at a good value.What we don’t: Time-consuming to set up, partial-coverage rainfly, and mesh door is draft-prone. The North Face can be hit or miss in the camping market, but they have a winner in their Wawona collection. Updated fairly recently, the biggest shift was to a hybrid double-wall construction (the prior generation used a less breathable single-wall build), and they also retooled the pole structure to make setup easier. Offered in four- and six-person capacities, the tunnel-like design is reminiscent of REI’s Wonderland 6 below and provides a generous amount of interior space, including around 3 more square feet of floor area and an additional 2 inches of peak height—all for around $125 less. And we love the massive front vestibule (44.7 sq. ft.) that easily doubles as a seating area—to achieve the same versatility with the Wonderland, you’ll have to purchase the Mud Room add-on ($125) separately. Added up, the Wawona is an impressively livable design and an excellent all-around value.  That said, despite the updated pole structure, we still found the Wawona to be considerably time-consuming and tedious to set up. The vestibule in particular must be guyed out tightly to stay upright, and the unique pole structure took some time to get taut and secure. The upside is that the hybrid double-wall build vents considerably better than a single-wall tent like the NEMO Wagontop below, and it’s also less prone to collecting moisture in humid or rainy weather. Final nitpicks include the rainfly, which doesn’t cover the lower portion of the tent, and the all-mesh door can be a source of serious heat loss and drafts in the cold (for a more weather-worthy option, see REI’s Base Camp below). But no tent is perfect, and the Wawona’s mesh-heavy build, expansive interior, and reasonable cost earn it our top billing for 2022.See The North Face Wawona 6 A Close Second (With Better Weather Protection) 2. REI Co-op Base Camp 6 ($549) Floor area: 84 sq. ft.Peak height: 74 in.Capacities: 4P, 6PWeight: 20 lbs. 10 oz.What we like: Sturdy, weather-worthy structure and ease of use.What we don’t: Pretty pricey and not as tall as the Wonderland or Skyward. Sitting near the top of REI’s camping lineup for 2022 is their Base Camp 6, which takes cues from mountaineering designs for a sizable boost in weather-worthiness. The dome shape and overlapping five-pole system mean the walls aren’t as vertical as the Wawona’s above, but it’s still very easy to move around inside, and the reward is far better resistance against strong gusts (it’s rated for 3+ season use, meaning the tent can hold its own). And the rest of the design is equally up to snuff with an excellent mix of quality materials and design features, including two roof vents, functional organization, and even reflective…

View Details

The Best Backpacking Tents of 2022 – GearJunkie

The Best Backpacking Tents of 2022 Whether you’re looking to spend 100 nights on the trail or want to stick to a tight budget, we’ve found the best backpacking tents of 2022. From PCT hikers spending 6 months on the trail to the nascent hiker spending 6 days on their first solo backpacking trip, a good tent is the cornerstone of outdoor preparedness. The right tent can be a shelter from the elements and critters. In the wild, it’s a home away from home. Our team of testers has spent hundreds of nights in tents in weather conditions that run the gamut from excruciating desert heat to frigid winter nights at high elevations to bring you our selection of the best backpacking tents for this year. When it comes to picking a tent, one truth stands out: no single tent will work well for every situation. Sometimes you want a superlight bivy that just keeps the bugs away on a long hike. Other times, you want a burly winter abode capable of standing up to gale-force winds and heavy snow. Maybe you want that tent that can do a little of everything. In general, picking a tent largely comes down to how you plan to use it. If you need help deciding, check out our buyer’s guide. And if you’re looking for something roomier for car camping or family camping, we have a separate review of the best camping tents. We considered six factors while evaluating the best backpacking tents: ease of setting up, durability and materials, weight and packed size, interior space, weather resistance, and value. Floor space and packed weight were the most important factors to our panel, while extra features such as pouches and pockets weighed less heavily in our evaluation. Each tent excels in one or more of these aspects, and we have awarded outstanding models “Best of Rating” corresponding to their outstanding qualities. So whether you are pinching pennies, ready to splurge on the tent of your dreams, or just wanting to replace your tattered gear, we have found a tent that can fit your budget and needs. Scroll through to see all of our recommended buys, or jump to the category you’re looking for. At the end of our list, be sure to check out our comparison chart and FAQ section. Best Overall Best Budget Best Ultralight Best Value Ultralight Best Minimalist Best of the Rest The Best Backpacking Tents of 2022 Best Overall Backpacking Tent: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 Looking for a three-season freestanding tent that tips the scales at just 3 pounds, 2 ounces? Enter the Big Agnes Copper Spur ($500). Although you can find lighter tents on the market, this tent is light enough to make it a contender for the best backpacking tent, even for the gram-counters among us. This tent boasts a good overlap between the bathtub floor and the rainfly, ensuring a dry night’s sleep. Above the floor material, quality mesh provides a breathable, well-ventilated space that should keep condensation low. With so little weight in your pack, you get a really comfortable abode for the trail. It has two doors, two vestibules, 29 square feet of floor space, and 18 square feet of combined vestibule space. The vestibules transform into awnings with trekking poles to cook under or to allow airflow. Easy-to-use tent buckles on the corners where the fly attaches make for quick setup in a storm. We also appreciated the storage pockets at the feet and head for electronics, snacks, or layers. Plus, the ceiling pocket at the head has…

Start Reading Now

13 Best Camping Tents for 2022, According to an Expert

The Best Camping Tents for Every Guy’s BudgetPeak camping season will be here before you know it. Whether you’re a summer camper who loves to hit the hiking trails or a spring jumpstart camper that’s up to explore somewhere you’ve never been, you’ll need the right essentials. Rations, clothing, boot, and of course, the best camping tent for your needs. Your camping tent could make the difference between a memorable adventure or a disaster you’ll wish you forgot. It’s important to know not all camping tents are made the same. And what you end up buying should be directly influenced by the adventure you are undertaking. We asked an expert to weigh in on what to look for when shopping for the best camping tent for your nature getaway from top camping tent brands. After all, it’s never too early to start preparing for the camping season ahead. How To Find the Best Camping TentThere is a lot to consider in your search for the best camping tent for your adventure needs. You’ll want to consider the season, type of adventure (backpacking or campground,) and the number of people using it. Obviously, if you have a family, a one or two-person camping tent just isn’t going to cut it. (Leaving the kids to the elements is never a good look.) Opt for a tent that comfortably fits at least four people.Aside from the size, there are generally three types of camping tents: three-season, three or four-season, and four-season tents. Three-season tents are cooling, lightweight, and act as a shelter in the spring, summer, or fall with mesh vents for easy, breezy airflow. Three-to-four or four-season tents are a lot more heavy-duty, built to withstand heavy rain and snowfall, and are made with heartier materials and more poles than your standard three-season tent. The grade goes up to five and beyond for more professional outdoor enthusiasts. Seasoned camper and the manager of BackCountry.com’s Ozark Trail Cabin TentEasiest to Assemble: Decathlon Quechua Two-Second TentBest Three-Person Camping Tent: Kelty Cabana Shade TentBest Family Tent:

Start Reading Now

The 13 Best Two-Person Tents, Tested by Experts

The 13 Best Two-Person Tents, Tested by Experts We independently research, test, review, and recommend the best products—learn more about our process. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission. Conor Ralph / TripSavvy. Two-person tents are an excellent option for couples that want to keep their gear to a minimum and don’t mind close quarters. They also work well for solo campers wanting more space inside their tent. Since tent sizes aren’t standardized, you can find quite a range of tents described as “two-person tents,” so we recommend checking out the actual dimensions before deciding. In our picks below, we select several that range from extra-roomy car camping options to minimalist ultralight options that feel more like one-person tents. Whether you’re a solo ultralight gram-counter or a couple that car camps a few times a year, we’ve got a two-person tent option that should work for you and your camping style. Here are the best two-person tents currently available. Courtesy of REI What We Like Affordable Simple design and setup Large and spacious interior (for a two-person tent) Durable What We Don’t Like Bulky packaged size The REI Half Dome is a staple tent in REI’s in-house lineup. Go to any campground or backcountry dispersed camping area, and you’re almost guaranteed to see the Half Dome more than any other single tent model. The classic Half Dome recently got an update that shaved off a pound and made this an even more compelling all-around backpacking tent option. It’s listed at “2+” for sizing, and unlike some two-person tents, you can comfortably fit two adults sleeping side-by-side. It’s also a simple, fully freestanding structure that we weighed at 4.7 pounds, but it doesn’t suffer from the flimsiness of some ultralight, semi-freestanding tents in this category. We tested the Half Dome SL2+ both in our Brooklyn testing lab and in the Colorado Rockies backcountry, where nighttime temperatures were in the 20s, and high winds buffeted us nightly. The update to this tent doesn’t go crazy with a complete redesign, but the fully hubbed pole system (it’s essentially one pole, all interconnected via two hubs and shock cords) is a nice touch that makes the setup nearly dummy-proof. The tent is symmetrical, so you can’t really place the poles in the wrong spots, and they’re color-coded, to boot. We gave it my standard “don’t read the instructions” test and had zero issues getting it fully set up with stakes; however, the rainfly was a bit tight. It’s a sturdy structure even without stakes, but we found that proper taut staking is essential (as with any tent) to keep the tent flapping noise from keeping you up in high winds. We were lazy with one stake and had to fix it at night to get the rain fly taut and quiet. While the weight is very respectable, the one major downside is that the volume of the tent broken down and packaged up is relatively large at 7 x 20.5 inches. Part of this is a result of the hub design, which keeps you from breaking the pole system down entirely for storage, but also the inclusion of the footprint and slightly heavier-duty materials than more streamlined ultralight tents. This trade-off won’t matter to some but could be a deal-breaker for others more concerned with space in their pack or weight. Packed Size: 7 x 20.5 inches | Dimensions: 90 x 54 x 45 inches | Packed Weight: 4.7 pounds | Seasons: 3 Conor Ralph / TripSavvy. Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2. What We Like Super easy setup Great storage Ultralight What We Don’t Like Durability could still be an issue We put the Half Dome as the best overall two-person tent because of its performance and price. If you’re looking for a slightly lighter tent with the same performance chops and are willing to get a smidge more spendy, the Copper Spur HV UL2 is for you. Big Agnes has been innovating in the backcountry space for years now. The best-selling Copper Spur series is a fruit of those years of labor and learning. Big…

Don’t delay. Read now.

Best Backpacking Tents for 2022 | Outdoor Life

Best Backpacking Tents for 2022 Updated Sep 2, 2022 6:10 AM Protecting yourself—and your gear—from the elements is core to the backpacking experience, and that starts with choosing the best backpacking tent for your needs. From mosquitoes, to downpours, to surprise summer snow and windstorms, finding a tent that you can sleep soundly in is pivotal. Our picks are some of the best backpacking tents on the market today, engineered to protect you from the elements with only a few pounds of nylon and aluminum.  Best 1-Person: REI Co-op Quarter Dome SL 1 TentBest 2-Person: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2Best 3-Person: Tarptent Cloudburst 3Most Versatile: NEMO Kunai 3–4 Season Backpacking TentBest Budget: Ozark Trail 2-Person Backpacking Tent Things to Consider Before Buying a Backpacking Tent Purpose  Backpackers can expect to face a variety of conditions depending on the time of year and the part of the country they are exploring, so knowing the extremes of your climate is essential to choosing a tent. The tents in this selection are primarily three-season tents, although the Nemo Kenai pick is appropriate for mild winter conditions, and we’d stick to the summer months with our budget pick. First-time tent buyers should know that four-season tents are generally built to hold heat in, and are not an appropriate choice if the primary season you plan to backpack in is summer.  Freestanding vs. Not Freestanding The majority of backpacking tents on the market are freestanding, meaning that once you snap poles into their grommets, you’ll have a reasonable approximation of what the final structure will look like. Freestanding tents are a great choice for first-time backpackers, as there tends to be less guesswork during the initial set up. The advantage of non-freestanding tents is that they are typically lighter than their freestanding counterparts (some even do away with separate poles as well by incorporating trekking poles into the design), but they usually take some practice to get used to.  Single Wall vs. Double Wall The three-person tent on our list is an example of a classic single-wall design, meaning that the main body of the tent is waterproof, rather than a separate rainproof shell that attaches to the exterior side of the poles. Single-wall tents tend to work best for backpackers in climates with minimal bugs and a tendency for rain—their main advantage is that the interior of your tent will stay dry during setup (they are usually also a bit lighter in weight), but they tend to collect condensation more rapidly on the interior and run hotter at the height of summer. Double-wall tents, which have a mesh body with a waterproof layer thrown over top, tend to breathe better and work best for backpackers exploring climes with substantial mosquitoes or other bugs.  Weight Car camping tents are bulky, with even the lightest models weighing upwards of five pounds per person. Backpacking tents are much lighter, typically weighing less than three pounds per person, with some ultralight (UL) models approaching one pound or less. There is usually a tradeoff with weight savings for durability and price with backpacking tents. Backpackers focused on short trips may prefer a heavier option while those that plan on high-mileage days would do better with…

Get the text you want


>13:06We look at test and review what will be seen as the best 3-4 person family tent – due out in 2023. If you love camping then this is a video …YouTube · The Hadwins · 5 days ago

11 Best Backpacking Tents 2022 [Budget, Ultralight & More]

11 Best Backpacking Tents 2022 [Budget, Ultralight & More] Last Updated on June 5, 2022The Best Backpacking Tents of 2022: One through Six-Person Tents for All HikersPicking out one of 2022’s best backpacking tents for your gear list is no small task. Because, in the wild and unforgiving backcountry, your tent is the only thing protecting you from the wind, rain, and critters that await outside.That’s why we’ve carefully chosen the 11 best backpacking tents on the market and given you a detailed rundown of each. From budget to high-end, one-person to six-person, minimalist to full-featured, freestanding to trekking pole — our tent recommendations run the gamut to suit every type of backpacker.And, because we’re gear nerds, we’ve analyzed each product for seven essential factors: weight, floor dimensions, capacity, primary material, tent style, weather resistance, and price.We’ve also recommended four top-notch sets of tent stakes and put together a list of helpful add-on accessories that can maximize your tent’s potential. Much like the shelters on this list, we’ve got you covered.So, whether you’re a thru-hiker looking for a one-man ultralight shelter or a family of five searching for their next backcountry home, we hope you find exactly what you’re after.Ready to dive into the best backpacking tents of 2022?Let’s do it.BEST BACKPACKING TENTS: TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Best Overall Backpacking Tent: Zpacks Duplex 2. Best Freestanding Tent: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 3. Best Ultralight Tent: Hyperlite Mountain Gear UltaMid 2 4. Sub-$100 Buy: River Country Products Trekker 2.2 5. Sub-$200 Buy: REI Passage 2 6. Best Four-Season Option: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 7. Ultralight One-Person Shelter: Zpacks Altaplex 8. Popular for Two People: Nemo Dragonfly 2 9. Lightweight Three-Person Tent: MSR Mutha Hubba NX 3 10. Sturdy Four-Person Tent: Marmot Tungsten 4 11. Spacious Haven for Families: MSR Habitude 6 12. Best Ultralight Tarp: Hyperlite Mountain Gear Flat Tarp 13. Tent Stakes We Recommend 14. Other Useful Tent Accessories 15. Parameters We Use to Rate Tents 16. Dial in the Rest of Your Kit 17. Final Thoughts: Best Backpacking Tents 18. More Hiking & Backpacking ResourcesBest Overall Backpacking Tent Zpacks Duplex + Optional Flex Kit Add-OnMSRP: $649 Weight: 1 lb 3 oz | 539 grams Floor Dimensions: 90″ x 45″ Capacity: 2-person Main Material: DCF Weather Resistance: 3-season Freestanding? No, but can be with Flex Kit The Good: Extremely lightweight, reliable, fantastic weather resistance, doesn’t stretch or wet out The Not-So-Good: Pricey, difficult setup If you’ve backpacked regularly, you’ve likely seen a Zpacks Duplex or two dotting the landscape. Why? Because this cutting-edge backpacking tent is the best option on the 2022 market, and it’s not a secret anymore.I’ve learned from experience that it doesn’t get much lighter, more compact, and weather-resistant than this tent. I’ve hunkered down in my Duplex during torrential downpours, 100-mph wind gusts, dust storms, and more – all the while staying dry and comfortable each time. Thanks to its DCF material, this tent is 100% waterproof and won’t ever sag or stretch out, even in the worst weather. It’s spacious for one person, pretty snug for two, and would work perfectly for a single hiker and their dog.So, why am I recommending a trekking pole backpacking tent as the best option overall? Because it can transform into a freestanding tent with the optional 10.2-oz Flex Kit add-on. This clever upgrade gives backpackers the versatility to add poles to their setup when they expect tough conditions to stake down, fear volatile weather, or just want a little extra room to stretch out inside.The Duplex is a high-performance tent that rings in at $649, and the Flex Kit is $125. These prices are a bit spendy, but for those ready to slash their base weight and step up their backpacking game, the splurge could be well worth the investment. If you want a quality two-person freestanding tent at a more approachable price, check out the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 or the Nemo…

See More

Best Ultralight Tents of 2022 — CleverHiker

Best Ultralight Tents of 2022 — CleverHiker A backpacking tent will be among the heaviest items you carry on backcountry adventures. If you’re an ultralight backpacker or a long distance thru-hiker, an ultralight tent is one of the easiest ways to cut weight and lighten your load.We’ve spent hundreds of hours researching and backpacked thousands of miles trail-testing dozens of tents to put together this list of the very best ultralight tents on the market. BEST ULTRALIGHT 1-PERSON TENTS – 1-Person tents usually have only one door/vestibule and can be a pretty tight fit, but weigh next to nothing and are very compact. We sometimes bring a 2-person tent for solo adventures because there’s more wiggle room, and we like the convenience of two doors and vestibules. Best ultralight 1-person tents: Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo, Zpacks Plex Solo & Gossamer Gear The One BEST ULTRALIGHT BACKPACKING TENTMSRP (Duplex): $699MEASURED WEIGHT (Duplex): 1 lb. 7.7 oz.DIMENSIONS (L x W x H): 90 x 45 x 48 in.PROS: Ultralight, 2 doors/vestibules, ample space for two (Triplex), DCF material won’t sag when wet or soak up water, trekking poles can double as tent poles, seams are factory-tapedCONS: Expensive, condensation management necessary for single-wall tentsBOTTOM LINE: The ZPacks Duplex and Triplex are among our all-time favorite ultralight tents for thru-hiking and fast and light adventures. These tents provide an excellent amount of interior space and weather protection while being freakishly lightweight. The DCF material makes these tents pretty expensive, but it’s also why they’re so light, fully waterproof, durable, and don’t sag when wet. We like to use the Zpacks carbon fiber poles (sold separately) with our Plex for convenience, but you can save even more weight by using trekking poles as the tent structure. We’re partial to the Duplex for solo hikes and the Triplex for more interior space when hiking with a partner. Check out our full review of the Duplex here and the Triplex here. BEST FREESTANDING ULTRALIGHT TENTMSRP (UL2): $499.95MEASURED WEIGHT (UL2): 3 lb. 1 oz.DIMENSIONS (L x W x H): 88 x 52/42 x 40 in. (wider at head)PROS: Spacious, quick/easy to pitch, great pockets, 2 large doors/vestibules, quality construction/materials, freestanding, double-wall is better for condensation management, seams are factory-sealed/tapedCONS: Slightly less durable than some tents, rainfly zippers can snag, a bit pricey, heavier than someBOTTOM LINE: The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 and UL3 are a little heavier than some others on this list, but their excellent balance of interior space, weather protection, and ease-of-use is worth the extra ounces. The Copper Spur is one of the few freestanding tents on our list. This design makes choosing a camp spot much easier, and setup is a lot quicker than many other ultralight tents. If you’re okay with a tighter interior or you often backpack solo, the UL2 is an excellent choice. For pairs, we suggest bumping up to the UL3, which has more interior space and only weighs 13 ounces more. Check out our full review of the Copper Spur HV UL2 here. BEST VALUE ULTRALIGHT TENT FOR LIVABILITY & WEIGHTMSRP (DUO): $385MEASURED WEIGHT (DUO): 2 lb. 13 oz.DIMENSIONS (L x W x H):…

Curious? Read on

16 best family tents to buy for 2022

16 best family tents to buy for summer camping We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article. Gary John NormanGetty Images With summer finally upon us once more, now is the perfect time to invest in a trusty tent, round up the family and head into the great outdoors for a night or two under the stars.Whether you’re a small family of three or a big group of eight, there are some amazing designs out there that the whole clan will adore.To help you shop smartly, our expert testers and editors have found the best family tents for pitching up in comfort, luxury and ease during the 2022 camping season. Not only are they all ideal for camping holidays around the UK, but also for use in the garden, for family picnics or when the kids fancy getting cosy in a sleeping bag on a balmy night. Our top picks include teepee-style tents, luxury designs with king-sized bedrooms and cheaper options if you’re after something affordable. How we test family tentsCountry Living sent each tent to a family of camping enthusiasts and asked them to set it up, sleep in it for at least one night and take it down again. Our testers fed back on how spacious their tent felt inside and how much light and fresh air it let in. They scored their tent on its instructions, ease of use and design.Back in the lab, our in-house team tested each tent’s waterproofing capabilities using a hydrostatic head machine. The five tents stamped with the Country Living Approved logo have been expert-tested as above, but there are also some great editors’ picks to browse.Happy camping! 1 of 16 Four-person tent regatta.com Regatta Kolima V2 6-Man Family Tunnel Inflatable Tent An inflatable tent can make your life easier, and this one does just that during the set-up process. It’s quite large, so you’ll need three people to pitch it, but our testers found this quick and easy to do. Putting it away was another kettle of fish, and they struggled to get it back in the bag, but once successful, they liked that they could carry it around like a backpack.Its separate sleep pod and large porch area provided plenty of space, the windows let in natural light and the hook for hanging a torch proved handy. 2 of 16 Four-person tent wildbounds.com Kelty Grand Mesa 4 Tent This tent was so easy to pitch that our tester didn’t have to consult the instructions and got it done alone. They were impressed with the poles and pegs’ quality, too, with the poles almost slotting themselves together. Once pitched, the tent’s size was slightly disappointing, and the family of four felt a little squished. If it isn’t raining, however, you can use the porch flap to add some more space. It’s perfect for shorter stays and avoiding the faff involved in pitching a more complex tent. 3 of 16 Six-person tent wiggle.co.uk Nordisk Alfheim 12.6 Tent If…

Find Out More